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Thu Sep 29, 2022, 10:24 AM

Florida has nuclear power plants right on the coastline. Yikes, that doesn't sound safe.

They may want to rethink that.

11 replies, 686 views

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Reply Florida has nuclear power plants right on the coastline. Yikes, that doesn't sound safe. (Original post)
fightforfreedom Sep 2022 OP
Wounded Bear Sep 2022 #1
genxlib Sep 2022 #2
fightforfreedom Sep 2022 #3
Hortensis Sep 2022 #10
sop Sep 2022 #4
fightforfreedom Sep 2022 #5
DetroitLegalBeagle Sep 2022 #6
Brother Buzz Sep 2022 #11
Demsrule86 Sep 2022 #7
Zeitghost Sep 2022 #8
Hortensis Sep 2022 #9

Response to fightforfreedom (Original post)

Thu Sep 29, 2022, 10:27 AM

1. Fukushima again?

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Response to fightforfreedom (Original post)

Thu Sep 29, 2022, 10:32 AM

2. They need the water for cooling

Turkey Point was right in the path of Hurricane Andrew and survived without danger..

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turkey_Point_Nuclear_Generating_Station

August 24, 1992
Turkey Point was directly hit by Hurricane Andrew on August 24, 1992, destroying two raw water tanks and portions of the fire protection systems, draining another raw water tank, partially disabling the fire protection systems, causing severe damage to various non-nuclear structures, and cracking the smokestack for fossil-fueled Unit 1. The smokestack later had to be demolished and rebuilt. It also suffered a total loss of offsite power, requiring the use of the onsite emergency diesel generators for several days. No significant damage was done to the plant's nuclear containment buildings.[16][17] The plant was built to withstand winds of up to 235 mph (380 km/h), greatly exceeding the maximum winds recorded by most category 5 hurricanes.


High and strong is the key

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Response to genxlib (Reply #2)

Thu Sep 29, 2022, 10:36 AM

3. Doesn't sound safe to me, sorry.

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Response to fightforfreedom (Reply #3)

Thu Sep 29, 2022, 11:16 AM

10. But IS it safe? Or safe as other places or sources?

The answer is science-based.

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Response to fightforfreedom (Original post)

Thu Sep 29, 2022, 10:37 AM

4. The Turkey Point nuclear power plant just south of Miami is a good case in point:

"Safety concerns at Turkey Point are rising, along with the sea level...The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has extended the plantís license to 2052, 40 years longer than it was originally designed to operate."

"If you live in South Florida, you likely know all about the crippling deficiencies that have hampered this aging plant for the past decade or so. It is uncontested, even by FPL, that the reactorís cooling system ó a giant, radiator-like series of unlined canals thatís not used in any other plant in the United States ó has been leaking into Miamiís drinking-water supply; this contamination, in turn, has made it difficult for the reactor to tap into a reliable source of fresh water ó without which the scalding reactor cannot properly cool itself."

"South Florida, of course, gets hurricanes, and Turkey Point ó like the Japanese reactor at Fukushima ó sits precariously right on the waterís edge, with a growing population of more than 3 million people living less than 25 miles away. Now layer on the NRCís refusal to consider realistic sea-level rise projections."

"Instead of trusting federal government recommendations to plan critical infrastructure for at least 6 feet of sea-level rise by 2100, the NRC, instead, is accepting FPLís own internal estimate: just one foot of sea-level rise by 2100."

"Even the least severe government projections (as calculated by University of Florida mapping tools) predict that the cooling system will be underwater by 2040 ó 12 years before this new license is set to expire."

https://www.theinvadingsea.com/2021/08/25/safety-concerns-at-turkey-point-are-rising-along-with-the-sea-level/

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Response to sop (Reply #4)

Thu Sep 29, 2022, 10:41 AM

5. A disaster waiting to happen.

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Response to fightforfreedom (Original post)

Thu Sep 29, 2022, 10:59 AM

6. Pretty much all(if not all)nuclear plants are near water

They need the water for cooling.

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Response to DetroitLegalBeagle (Reply #6)

Thu Sep 29, 2022, 11:32 AM

11. When they are not built near water they go the cooling tower route

The cooling water is recycled in a closed loop and used over and over again



Here's The Palo Verde Nuclear plant in Arizona; it looks like the eggheads figured how to shrink the cooling towers and still make it work

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Response to fightforfreedom (Original post)

Thu Sep 29, 2022, 11:02 AM

7. I do not like nuclear energy...there are better ways.

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Response to Demsrule86 (Reply #7)

Thu Sep 29, 2022, 11:09 AM

8. That attitude

Has killed hundred of thousands and will kill millions more.


Few things have caused more death and destruction than the anti-nuclear movement.

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Response to fightforfreedom (Original post)

Thu Sep 29, 2022, 11:11 AM

9. Right. They need A LOT OF water. And all of Florida can be considered effectively

"on the coast" now that the whole state is disappearing under giant hurricanes.

Unfortunate news is that we have to use them as we transition as quickly as they allow to adequate supplies of renewable, sustainable energy.

Good news is that we have nuclear! What if we didn't and for that reason transition had to take far longer?

More good news is they're designed to withstand hurricanes. Not just to "sound like" they may or may not.

Better news is major advances in nuclear technology. Including portable units. Maybe someday we'll need to find room in the garage for personal units, though probably not.

Best news is that when the generators being built today age out they probably won't be replaced because there should no longer be a compelling need for large scale nuclear power. We'll be able to overheat and overcool our homes as we choose with renewable energy by then.

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