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Sat Aug 30, 2014, 04:44 PM

The Toxins That Affected Your Great-Grandparents Could Be In Your Genes

Michael Skinner, a professor of biology at Washington State University, ignited a firestorm of debate in 2005 when he and colleagues published a paper in Science describing how a brief, one-time exposure of pregnant rats to common agricultural chemicals led to heritable changes to their descendants, including great great-grandpups. The controversy arose around their assertion that these changes were not passed down through mutations to the DNA, but rather by changes to so-called epigenetic marks, such as small molecules that attach to the DNA and modulate how genes work. According to conventional dogma, all of these marks—with a few notable exceptions—are erased and reset twice while a fetus develops in the womb, so any acquired epimutations should get wiped clean in the next generation.

Since that 2005 article numerous studies published by Skinner’s group and others have reported transgenerational inheritance of acquired characteristics, mainly in plants, mice and rats but also in flies, worms and other species. These findings beg an obvious question: Does the same phenomenon happen in humans?

In his academic writings and an article in the August 2014 issue of Scientific American, Skinner says that the answer is almost certainly yes. Given the myriad aspects of biology shared among our species and others, he argues, these studies suggest that pollutants ranging from pesticides to jet fuel are partly to blame for diseases that appear even in people never exposed to the chemicals directly—people who simply inherited the epigenetic damage from their parents or grandparents.
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/can-we-inherit-the-environmental-damage-done-to-our-ancestors-video/



Short Video
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/smithsonian-channel/04_skinner_michael_smithmov/

One of the common diseases that passed down through the generations due to ancestral exposure to DDT and Jet fuel was obesity. We may finally be seeing one of the causes of the obesity epidemic coming to light.

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Reply The Toxins That Affected Your Great-Grandparents Could Be In Your Genes (Original post)
NutmegYankee Aug 2014 OP
JustAnotherGen Aug 2014 #1
lunatica Aug 2014 #2
JustAnotherGen Aug 2014 #4
NutmegYankee Aug 2014 #3
benld74 Aug 2014 #5
etherealtruth Aug 2014 #6
Erich Bloodaxe BSN Aug 2014 #7
jehop61 Aug 2014 #8
eppur_se_muova Aug 2014 #9
Ilsa Aug 2014 #10

Response to NutmegYankee (Original post)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 04:51 PM

1. I have HLA-B27 triggered Ankylosing Spondylitis

That my great grandfather had (same gene). He was a French WW I vet - and his developed after losing a few toes to trench rot - and gas masks aside - chemical weapons. There was a big influx during WW I - the first war with chemical weapons as par for the course.

I tend to believe this.

I also believe that exposure to the Rainbow of Agents (orange was the tip of the iceberg) gets in your DNA.

Thanks for this - I know you are focusing on obesity - but this could have longe range impact on the children and descendants of foreign wars and military shenanigans in the 60's and 70's.

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Response to JustAnotherGen (Reply #1)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 04:58 PM

2. One of the women that works with me has trace amounts of Agent Orange

in her genes. She's in her mid 30s or maybe her early 30s. Her father is a Vietnam veteran. Her immune system is compromised and will always be that way. She gets sick often and many times ends up in the hospital. If it weren't for FEMLA she wouldn't be able to keep a job.

She has decided not to have children because of it.

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Response to lunatica (Reply #2)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 05:23 PM

4. My AS appeared full blown in my mid 30's

All of those years of being 'sickly' - ugh!

My brother shows trace amounts of pink, blue, and orange - but we know my dad was coming home from playing "war games" from Central Amerca when my brother was very little.

I worry about him - after watching what those did to my dad when he was dying. Their organs start to melt 50 years later . . .

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Response to JustAnotherGen (Reply #1)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 04:59 PM

3. I think it's connected to a bunch of diseases.

Mice studies alone showed links to Low Testosterone and prostate cancer in males, and early puberty and ovarian disease in women. In both genders, obesity and glucose intolerance/insulin resistance was found.

Given the wide variability of people, there are probably many more diseases that have their roots in our polluted world.

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Response to NutmegYankee (Original post)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 05:40 PM

5. Makes sense to me,,,

and the statement made whenever spills occur remains the same

There is no evidence that _____________ causes __________ in humans.

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Response to NutmegYankee (Original post)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 06:02 PM

6. Environment becomes heredity

There was a great article in one of the environmental science journals a few years back ... unfortunately i haven't been avble to locate it but did run across this:


http://www.psmag.com/navigation/nature-and-technology/environment-becomes-heredity-4425/

Is Betsy merely an overly picky girl destined for spinsterhood? No. Betsy is just observant — observant enough to preserve her species. You see, Betsy is a Sprague Dawley rat, a variety commonly used in biological experiments and the very kind used by Andrea Gore and David Crews of the University of Texas, Austin and Michael Skinner of Washington State University, Pullman, who have found something amazing and scary in a mate-selection experiment very similar to Betsy’s speed-dating scenario.

In the experiment, female Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to potential male suitors, some of which were descended from one great-great-grandmother rat who had been given a high dose of the fungicide vinclozolin when she was pregnant. Vinclozolin, used worldwide on a variety of agricultural products including wine grapes, is banned in Scandinavian countries, but the EPA continues to allow its use in the United States on certain crops.



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Response to NutmegYankee (Original post)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 06:40 PM

7. Just bloody wonderful.

This would also serve as a confounding factor for a variety of studies that haven't taken it into account when designing and analyzing studies, since it would show up in 'controls' who supposedly have no exposure to whatever it is. If true, it's going to cause a hell of a lot of studies over the years to have had data that might not really reflect the difference between the 'exposed' and the 'actually unexposed'.

(example - you do an 'exposed' group and a 'control' group you think is all 'unexposed', but many of whom might have had parents who were 'exposed'. Because you don't know to check for this, the rate of whatever it is in your extrapolated 'general population' is far higher, so your rate of whatever in your test group looks relatively lower. So you report that exposure is far more weakly related to whatever disease, because the rates of it in 'exposed' and 'control' are a lot closer together. And whatever it is thus looks 'safe' because it doesn't look to significantly increase the rate of disease from the test group to the control group.)

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Response to NutmegYankee (Original post)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 08:18 PM

8. Oh Lord

Do we really need something else to worry about?

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Response to NutmegYankee (Original post)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 08:39 PM

9. Epigenetic discoveries have occurred at a furious pace in the 21st Century ...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epigenetics

Although much of the science is now regarded as well established, it hasn't made its way down into textbooks and popular reading yet, with a very few exceptions. So most people are quite startled to learn that such things can happen.

A recommended read: http://www.powells.com/biblio/62-9780231161169-0#product_details

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Response to NutmegYankee (Original post)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 09:27 PM

10. A link to article on PTSD affecting offspring genetics

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24832930

This link was in one of the replies to the SA article.

Influences of Maternal and Paternal PTSD on Epigenetic Regulation of the Glucocorticoid Receptor Gene in Holocaust Survivor Offspring.

Yehuda R, Daskalakis NP, Lehrner A, Desarnaud F, Bader HN, Makotkine I, Flory JD, Bierer LM, Meaney MJ.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Differential effects of maternal and paternal posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been observed in adult offspring of Holocaust survivors in both glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity and vulnerability to psychiatric disorder. The authors examined the relative influences of maternal and paternal PTSD on DNA methylation of the exon 1F promoter of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR-1F) gene (NR3C1) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and its relationship to glucocorticoid receptor sensitivity in Holocaust offspring.


Snip

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