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Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:28 PM

My favorite movie adaptation of "A Christmas Carol"

is the one with Albert Finney as Scrooge made in 1970, this scene in particular:



How about you?

Here's a list of them:

•A Christmas Carol, 1908 — Essanay Studios in Chicago produced this 15-minute silent film, which starred Tom Ricketts as Ebenezer Scrooge. Ricketts is said to have directed the first motion picture ever in Hollywood, in 1909, titled “Justified.”

•A Christmas Carol, 1910 — J. Searle Dawley directed this 17-minute silent film. It featured Australian-born American actor Marc McDermott as Scrooge and Charles S. Ogle as Bob Cratchit.

•Old Scrooge, 1926 — This was the rerelease of a film by Pathe made in England in 1913 starring Seymour Hicks. This print is on DVD.
•Scrooge, 1935 — This was the first sound version and feature-length film of Dickens’ story. Seymour Hicks played Scrooge, a role he had played thousands of times onstage. Most of the ghosts, including that of Jacob Marley, are not actually shown on-screen, although their voices are heard.

•A Christmas Carol, 1938 — Made by MGM, this was America’s first film adaptation of the story. Lionel Barrymore, who played Scrooge annually on radio, was forced to drop out of the film because of arthritis. Reginald Owen took on the role of Scrooge, and the husband-and-wife team of Gene and Kathleen Lockhart played the Cratchits. It opened in December 1938 at New York City’s Radio City Music Hall, where it did moderately well. In England, it failed dismally at the box office.

•Scrooge, 1951 — Probably the best interpretation ever of the Dickens’ story. It was released as “A Christmas Carol” in the U.S. It starred Alastair Sim as Ebenezer Scrooge. Of all his 60 films, this is probably Scottish actor’s most celebrated performance. It received marvelous acclaim in Great Britain but had mixed reviews in the U.S. and was a box-office disappointment.

•Scrooge, 1970 — Starring Albert Finney, this lavish musical film adaptation of the Dickens story was filmed in London. Mr. Finney earned the title role even though he was only 34 years old at the time. Alec Guinness played Jacob Marley’s ghost. it got good reviews, earning Mr. Finney a Golden Globe for best actor in a musical or comedy. The film also notched four Oscar nominations. The musical score was composed by Leslie Bricusse, who wrote the Sammy Davis Jr. hit “The Candy Man.”

•A Christmas Carol, 1971 — Famed actor Alastair Sim, from the 1951 film, revisited the Scrooge character in this Academy Award-winning animated film version of the story, made for ABC television. Michael Hordern also reprised his 1951 performance as the voice of Marley’s Ghost. It was directed by Richard Williams (“Who Framed Roger Rabbit”) whose 4-year-old son, Alexander, provided the voice for Tiny Tim.
•Mickey’s Christmas Carol, 1983 — This 24-minute Walt Disney animated film featured Scrooge McDuck as a Scottish Scrooge (Alan Young) and Mickey Mouse as Bob Cratchit. It was the first new Mickey Mouse cartoon made in the 30 years since “The Simple Things.” It was nominated for an Academy Award as best animated short subject of 1983.

•A Christmas Carol, 1984 — George C. Scott starred as Ebenezer Scrooge in this made-for-television version. The film was directed by Clive Donner (“What’s New Pussycat”) who had been an editor of the 1951 film “Scrooge.” Susannah York played Mrs. Cratchit. The film was well-received and is considered one of the best adaptations of the classic tale.

•Scrooged, 1988 — Bill Murray plays Frank Cross as a cynically selfish TV executive in this modernization of the Dickens classic. The film was produced and directed by Richard Donner. It grossed $62 million on a $32 million budget. The film also starred Karen Allen and Robert Mitchum, along with Robert Goulet, Lee Majors, Mary Lou Retton and John Houseman as themselves.

•A Muppet Christmas Carol, 1992 — This musical comedy starred Michael Caine as Scrooge and Kermit the Frog as Bob Cratchit. It was the first Muppet film after the death of Muppets creator Jim Henson and was directed by Henson’s son Brian. It was released by Walt Disney Pictures and had moderate box-office success, earning $27 million domestically.

•A Christmas Carol, 1999 — “Star Trek: The Next Generation” star Patrick Stewart played Ebenezer Scrooge, and Richard E. Grant (“Withnail and I”) starred as Bob Cratchit in this made-for-TV film. Mr. Stewart previously had performed a series of successful theatrical readings of “A Christmas Carol” on Broadway and in London.

•A Christmas Carol: The Movie, 2001 — British actor Simon Callow (“A Room With a View”) is the voice of Scrooge in this animated film. Kate Winslet (“Titanic”) voiced the character Belle and sang the film’s theme, “What if,” which was a top-10 hit in Austria, Belgium and Ireland and hit No. 6 on the U.K. Singles Chart. Nicolas Cage performed the voice of Jacob Marley.

•A Christmas Carol: The Musical, 2004 — This $17 million television film was based on a 1994 stage musical of the same name, with songs written by Alan Menken (music) and Lynn Ahrens (lyrics). Kelsey Grammer (“Cheers,” “Frasier”) played Scrooge. Jason Alexander (“Seinfeld”) starred as Jacob Marley and sang a number called “Link by Link.” In a departure from the Dickens’ story, this version introduces us to Scrooge’s father, who is sentenced to debtor’s prison while his horrified family looks on.

•Barbie in a Christmas Carol, 2008 — This computer-animated version from Kidtoon Films went direct to DVD. Eden Starling, a glamorous singing diva in Victorian England, is the Scrooge in this version.

•A Christmas Carol, 2009 — Robert Zemeckis (“Back to the Future”) wrote and directed this 3-D film starring Jim Carrey in a multitude of roles. The film was produced through the process of performance capture, a technique Mr. Zemeckis had used in his films “The Polar Express” (2004) and “Beowulf” (2007). Mr. Carrey played Ebenezer Scrooge as a young, middle-aged and old man and also played the three ghosts who haunt Scrooge. The film was a box-office success, taking in almost $318.5 million worldwide so far.

•Doctor Who Christmas Special 2010: A Christmas Carol — Amy and Rory are trapped on a crashing space liner, and the only way the Doctor can rescue them is to save the soul of a lonely old miser, Kazran Sardick (Michael Gambon), the richest man in Sardicktown. This version premiers on BBC America on Christmas Day.


Read more: http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2010/dec/18/list-many-faces-scrooge/#ixzz3MZPBnHQh
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Arrow 32 replies Author Time Post
Reply My favorite movie adaptation of "A Christmas Carol" (Original post)
boston bean Dec 2014 OP
Bluenorthwest Dec 2014 #1
boston bean Dec 2014 #9
Journeyman Dec 2014 #2
adirondacker Dec 2014 #3
Capt.Rocky300 Dec 2014 #4
hlthe2b Dec 2014 #5
boston bean Dec 2014 #7
YarnAddict Dec 2014 #6
boston bean Dec 2014 #8
YarnAddict Dec 2014 #10
boston bean Dec 2014 #12
el_bryanto Dec 2014 #11
ChazInAz Dec 2014 #13
LWolf Dec 2014 #14
boston bean Dec 2014 #15
stage left Dec 2014 #16
Atman Dec 2014 #17
Paladin Dec 2014 #18
joeybee12 Dec 2014 #20
boston bean Dec 2014 #24
Paladin Dec 2014 #29
Brigid Dec 2014 #19
R B Garr Dec 2014 #21
IDemo Dec 2014 #22
aikoaiko Dec 2014 #23
hatrack Dec 2014 #25
Siwsan Dec 2014 #26
krawhitham Dec 2014 #27
dhill926 Dec 2014 #28
TorchTheWitch Dec 2014 #30
reddread Dec 2014 #31
boston bean Dec 2014 #32

Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:31 PM

1. Your favorite is also my own. Finney 1970, saw it fresh on the screen and several times since.

 

My favorite onstage Carol, Patrick Stewart's one man version. He was great as Tiny Tim.

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Response to Bluenorthwest (Reply #1)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:50 PM

9. Never got to see it on the big screen. They should do a re-release...

I bet it would be a hit.

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:32 PM

2. You forgot one of the greatest . . .

This was the first version I saw. I was about 8 years old. I've associated Scrooge with Mr Magoo every since.


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Response to Journeyman (Reply #2)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:36 PM

3. Yes, that one was a fond childhood lesson. nt

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:37 PM

4. We prefer the one with George C. Scott made in 1984.....

We watch it every Christmas Eve after dinner.

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:37 PM

5. Agree. Though the one I actually remember from very early childhood...

was the Mr. Magoo animated show that came on each year--much like the Peanuts Christmas special. 'Haven't seen it in some time, but imagine it is still around. The late, great Jim Backus (Gillegan's Island fame) voiced Magoo..

But, yes, there is something really special about the Albert Finney version.

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Response to hlthe2b (Reply #5)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:43 PM

7. Yes, someone above mentioned Mr. Magoo too. I do remember seeing it as well

when I was a child.

It wasn't on the Washington Post list, but probably should have been.

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:43 PM

6. I don't think I've ever seen the Albert Finney one

 

We've got the George C. Scott version.

"Scrooged" is a family favorite that we watch every year.

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Response to YarnAddict (Reply #6)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:46 PM

8. Give the Finney version a try.

My second favorite would be the Alistair Sim version made in 1951.

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Response to boston bean (Reply #8)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:55 PM

10. I will do that.

 

LOVE Christmas movies, especially love "A Christmas Carol." We saw the performance at the Pabst Theatre in Milwauke many, many years ago. Very, very special memory!

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Response to YarnAddict (Reply #10)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 06:01 PM

12. Dickens sure wrote a story, that shaped and retain the meaning and traditions of Christmas

going on 200 years... being first published in 1843.

I've never seen it on stage, but should be something I make a point to do one day.

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 05:59 PM

11. The ALbert Finney one is a favorite of mine - I like the George c Scott one OK

Micky's Christmas Carol is good as well .

Bryant

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 06:18 PM

13. 1910, Charles Ogle.

I believe Mr. Ogle also played Frankenstein's Monster that year, in the Edison version of Mary Shelley's story.
Amusingly, I'm playing Scrooge, myself, this year. For gits and shiggles, I'm using Boris Karloff's voice for the part.

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 06:19 PM

14. That's my favorite version, too!

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Response to LWolf (Reply #14)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 06:21 PM

15. Life likes me... hehehehe

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 06:26 PM

16. this is my favorite, too.

I love the reprise of this number. It brings me to tears everytime.

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 06:27 PM

17. Last night my wife put on the strangest version I've ever seen...

"All American Christmas Carol." Bizarre cast starred Taryn Manning as a "white trash" single mom (that's how it's described on IMDb, I swear) living in a trailer park. The ghosts were Beverly D'Angelo as her alcoholic mom, Eric Roberts as her favorite old long-hair rock star, and someone named Shiri Appleby as the geeky high school virgin ghost who escorts Manning on her visits. Even Meat Loaf makes an appearance. So much wrong with this film -- DU would have had a field day with everything politically incorrect about it. Don't look for any reviews on IMDb. No one bothered. It did, however, get a whopping 5.6 star rating, which is about 5 stars more than I would have expected.

Lots of references to "trailer trash" and typical lazy-poor-people jokes. If you have Netflix (or maybe it was Hulu) give it a look, in the same way you might rubberneck a car crash. I am amazed this movie ever got made, although it is "true" to the basic Christmas Carol story.

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 06:28 PM

18. Nothing can beat "Scrooge" (1951)

It's not Christmas until I get to see Alastair Sim do his thing. Brilliant work.

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Response to Paladin (Reply #18)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 06:32 PM

20. I agree...nt

 

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Response to Paladin (Reply #18)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 07:38 PM

24. Yes, that is my second choice.

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Response to boston bean (Reply #24)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 08:26 PM

29. Thank you so much for posting that link, boston bean.

That's the very best part of a very great holiday movie.

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 06:31 PM

19. I like the 1999 version with Patrick Stewart.

Which reminds me: time to pull it out to watch on DVD. 'Scrooged" is hilarious m, but I don't have that one.

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 06:40 PM

21. Yes, this was my fav for many years! I had it recorded on VHS

from sometime in the early 80's, if I remember, and I watched it every year on that tape for many years. I just love the music. It made me sad when I realized I had lost track of the tape, which wouldn't matter anyway since there aren't VHS machines anymore.

I don't see the Finney version played on TV much anymore. Maybe I've missed the showings. I do remember watching it one year with my SO, but he's not too fond of musicals. Last night we watched the George C. Scott version, and I would have to say that is my favorite right now. He is such a magnificent actor and presence and a tough act to follow. Edit: The Albert Finney version still has the best Marley, imo.

Another version we love a lot is the 2009 version with Jim Carrey. We watched in 3D when the picture came out and were thrilled with that! So that is one of our favorites now.

Thanks for reminding me about this Albert Finney version. I do intend to own a restored version of this as it's been a sentimental favorite for decades now. Great thread!

a little off topic: I also want to find a DVD of The Nutcracker version with Mikhail Baryshnikov, but it's out of print the last time I checked.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0136439/

You can't beat these classics!

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 07:05 PM

22. Alastair Sim and George C. Scott for the win n/t

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 07:09 PM

23. 1951 with Sim for the traditional. I don't think it was ever better.


But I also loved Scrooged with Bill Murray. It was a believable modern retelling.

Props man: I can't get the antlers glued to this little guy. We tried Crazy Glue, but it don't work.
Frank Cross: Did you try staples?

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Response to aikoaiko (Reply #23)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 07:40 PM

25. Definitely the 1951 version, w/o question . . .

Haven't yet seen any other version that comes close to capturing the Victorian gloom that permeates so much of Dickens, especially this story.

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 07:44 PM

26. I go 'old school', on this film - 1938 version with Reginald Owen as Scrooge

And Leo G Carroll as Marley. Possibly because this is the first version of the film I ever viewed, but Owen's version of Scrooge is just wonderful.

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 07:47 PM

27. Doctor Who Christmas Special 2010

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 08:08 PM

28. 1938....

grew up with this one. 1951 with Alastair Sim a close second....

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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 09:39 PM

30. this version has always been my favorite

Though I've only seen a few different ones. I actually didn't like the one with George C. Scott very much, but I haven't seen it in so many decades I don't even remember why that is anymore.

I think tonight I'll watch the Albert Finney one again. I've not seen it in years and years.



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Response to boston bean (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 09:43 PM

31. I hate people

 

that is my favorite. have to drag out the VCR to watch my copy every year.
the fellow who wrote the songs did not write music. they had an unsual arrangement of folks
working out the arrangements, as I understand it.
very well done.
Alec Guinness killed.

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Response to reddread (Reply #31)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 09:48 PM

32. yeah, LOL.

One of my fav's... what is this... I've never had it before (says scrooge)... of course you haven't (says the ghost of Christmas present) it's the milk of human kindness.

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