HomeLatest ThreadsGreatest ThreadsForums & GroupsMy SubscriptionsMy Posts
DU Home » Latest Threads » Forums & Groups » Main » General Discussion (Forum) » Are you sick of highly-pa...

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 03:46 PM

Are you sick of highly-paid teachers?

The below full-excerpt is reposted with permission:

Teachers' hefty salaries are driving up taxes, and they only work nine or ten months a year! It's time we put things in perspective and pay them for what they do -- babysit!
We can get that for less than minimum wage.

That's right. Let's give them $3.00 an hour and only the hours they worked; not any of that silly planning time, or any time they spend before or after school. That would be $19.50 a day (7:45 to 3:00 PM with 45 min. off for lunch and planning -- that equals 6-1/2 hours).
So each parent should pay $19.50 a day for these teachers to baby-sit their children. Now how many students do they teach in a day...maybe 30? So that's $19.50 x 30 = $585 a day.

However, remember they only work 180 days a year!!! I am not going to pay them for any vacations.

LET'S SEE....

That's $585 X 180= $105,300 per year. (Hold on! My calculator needs new batteries).

What about those special education teachers and the ones with Master's degrees? Well, we could pay them minimum wage ($7.75), and just to be fair, round it off to $8.00 an hour. That would be $8 X 6-1/2 hours X 30 children X 180 days = $280,800 per year.

Wait a minute -- there's something wrong here! There sure is!

The average teacher's salary (nationwide) is $50,000.

$50,000/180 days = $277.77 per day / 30 students = $9.25 / 6.5 hours = $1.42 per hour per student -- a very inexpensive baby-sitter and they even EDUCATE your kids!)

WHAT A DEAL!!!!

Make a teacher smile; repost this to show appreciation for all educators.

Meredith Menden

https://www.dailykos.com/story/2011/02/22/948224/-Are-you-sick-of-highly-paid-teachers?detail=facebook

53 replies, 6192 views

Reply to this thread

Back to top Alert abuse

Always highlight: 10 newest replies | Replies posted after I mark a forum
Replies to this discussion thread
Arrow 53 replies Author Time Post
Reply Are you sick of highly-paid teachers? (Original post)
Bubzer Jan 2016 OP
Blue Owl Jan 2016 #1
SheilaT Jan 2016 #2
DisgustipatedinCA Jan 2016 #3
malthaussen Jan 2016 #4
bluestateguy Jan 2016 #13
DisgustipatedinCA Jan 2016 #14
bluestateguy Jan 2016 #15
Odin2005 Jan 2016 #5
Bubzer Jan 2016 #6
daleanime Jan 2016 #9
LiberalArkie Jan 2016 #7
japple Jan 2016 #10
mainstreetonce Jan 2016 #8
DrBulldog Jan 2016 #11
annabanana Jan 2016 #25
Recursion Jan 2016 #31
dsc Jan 2016 #33
Recursion Jan 2016 #34
oberliner Jan 2016 #38
Recursion Jan 2016 #39
oberliner Jan 2016 #40
Recursion Jan 2016 #41
oberliner Jan 2016 #46
Octafish Jan 2016 #43
Recursion Jan 2016 #45
Octafish Jan 2016 #53
Rex Jan 2016 #50
wilt the stilt Jan 2016 #12
certainot Jan 2016 #16
madville Jan 2016 #17
JDPriestly Jan 2016 #18
Enthusiast Jan 2016 #30
Octafish Jan 2016 #44
Conch Jan 2016 #19
smirkymonkey Jan 2016 #20
californiabernin Jan 2016 #21
Jenny_92808 Jan 2016 #22
annabanana Jan 2016 #24
johnp3907 Jan 2016 #26
Elmer S. E. Dump Jan 2016 #23
Yupster Jan 2016 #27
Rex Jan 2016 #28
Recursion Jan 2016 #32
Rex Jan 2016 #49
hifiguy Jan 2016 #29
sailfla Jan 2016 #51
pampango Jan 2016 #35
avebury Jan 2016 #36
TBF Jan 2016 #37
AwakeAtLast Jan 2016 #42
DirkGently Jan 2016 #47
Bubzer Jan 2016 #48
sailfla Jan 2016 #52

Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 03:56 PM

1. Hmm, have yet to meet one...

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 04:02 PM

2. Some years back a teacher I know

 

somewhat facetiously suggested she be paid baby-sitting wages by the parents.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 04:05 PM

3. The COO at the bank I used to work at told me that teachers make $300K.

 

This was my boss's boss, and he liked to describe himself as the third most conservative person in America (behind his parents). I have several teachers in my family, and I know better. But this highly educated MORON was just sure teachers were all pulling down $300K.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DisgustipatedinCA (Reply #3)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 04:33 PM

4. 300,000 pennies, maybe. n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DisgustipatedinCA (Reply #3)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:06 PM

13. I had one teacher in high school who probably did make that much

but not from his taxpayer funded salary---that was more like $55,000.

No, it's because he wrote a book that sold a lot of copies.

He also picked up a few grand a year grading AP exams and as a consultant to the testing company.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to bluestateguy (Reply #13)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:08 PM

14. I had a teacher who owned several restaurants.

 

He was my Government teacher, and I think he just loved teaching even though he was likely making plenty of money with his restaurants.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DisgustipatedinCA (Reply #14)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:11 PM

15. I had another teacher who was from a wealthy family

He had a big trust fund, and much inherited money. Lived in a very ritzy neighborhood.

He loved teaching and was good at it.

But he too is the exception to the rule.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 04:39 PM

5. I think all teachers should be making AT LEAST $70,000 a year.

I think one of the problems with the education system right now is that a lot of the people who would make excellent teachers are able to get better paying jobs somewhere else. I know when I was in college the stereotype of education majors, especially elementary education, was of mediocre minds who could not make it elsewhere. That needs to change, and the best way to change it is to pay teachers enough to bring good teaching talent.

Teachers should be PAID as the professionals they are.

(And before somebody flames me, I'm not saying that there are not a lot of very good teachers out there, I was just making a generalization.)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Odin2005 (Reply #5)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 04:56 PM

6. Agreed!!!

Especially the part about 70k being the minimum pay! Too many good teachers are lost due to being overworked and under appreciated and under paid.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Reply #6)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 05:44 PM

9. Yeahup.....

it would help draw talented students into the teaching, lord knows we need to.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Odin2005 (Reply #5)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 05:00 PM

7. More than like the school district administrators.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Odin2005 (Reply #5)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 05:52 PM

10. Right. At least if they're making $70,000 per year, all of those unreimbursed supplies they

buy for their classrooms won't hurt as badly. I know teachers who spend quite a bit on school supplies, food, and things like kleenex, and cleaning supplies and they don't get reimbursed by the school system. It's still unfair and they should not have to spend their own money, but many teachers do it just because there are so many children in need.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 05:06 PM

8. If you can read this

If you can read this. PAY a teacher


Did you ever try to thank the plumber?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:01 PM

11. No, I'm sick of lowly-paid teachers.

 

That's why our children often get the bottom-of-the-barrel types into our classrooms.

Hint: the REST OF THE MODERN WORLD train their teachers and pays their teachers much more than we do.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DrBulldog (Reply #11)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:58 PM

25. (please..

actually READ the OP)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DrBulldog (Reply #11)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 08:24 AM

31. No, American teachers make basically the OECD average

And that average is skewed crazily by Luxemburg.



US teachers make more than their peers in South Korea, Japan, Germany, Switzerland, France, Finland, and the UK.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Reply #31)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 09:52 AM

33. relative matters though

that South Korean is making way more than I am if you factor in the median income there vs here.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to dsc (Reply #33)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 10:01 AM

34. No, that's PPP (nt)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Reply #31)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 11:51 AM

38. So you think US teacher salaries are about right?

 

Or even maybe too high?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to oberliner (Reply #38)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 11:54 AM

39. IDK. Are we actually having trouble retaining teachers?

That's what really determines that.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Reply #39)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 11:57 AM

40. I think there is some trouble attracting the best people to the job

 

Due in part to the salaries but also to the less the optimal working conditions in many cases.

A highly educated person who would make a great teacher probably has more attractive options.

Perhaps a higher salary would help draw some of those folks to the profession.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to oberliner (Reply #40)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 12:07 PM

41. Perhaps, though that's true of a lot of useful professions

AFAIK American schools are doing pretty well by historical standards; I don't see a big need to change much.

I'd like much less of an emphasis on testing, of course, but that's not a pay issue per se (except that that frustration leads to attrition)

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Reply #41)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 12:26 PM

46. In the U.S., 14% of new teachers resign by the end of their first year

 

33% leave within their first 3 years, and almost 50% leave by their 5th year.

Only 1 in 4 high school students graduate college-ready in the 4 core subjects of English, Reading, Math and Science.

https://www.dosomething.org/us/facts/11-facts-about-education-america


Personally, it seems from what I have read that public schools are really in bad shape and that attracting better teachers would help improve the situation.

As the above link claims, teacher quality is one of the most significant factors related to student achievement. I tend to agree.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Reply #31)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 12:20 PM

43. SavvyRoo?

What are the sources for your chart?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Octafish (Reply #43)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 12:26 PM

45. Googling "OECD teacher salary chart"; they're all the same



Here's one that includes those above us, too. Note Luxemburg.





It's pretty clear we're just slightly above the OECD average.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Reply #45)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 08:44 PM

53. World Economic Forum -- the Davos Globalists.

Thank you for that. Each of those must draw on the same source, as it appears whoever compiled the info found US teachers are getting $53,758 per year.

From what I've seen, the agenda from the Davos crowd is undemocratic. From last year's confab:

Taken For Granted At Davos That US Government Run On ‘Legalized Corruption’

By: DSWright
FireDogLake.com, Wednesday January 21, 2015

While there may be confusion among some in the US as to how the American political system operates, it is apparently taken for granted by participants at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland that politics in America is based on bribery and corruption.

In an interview at Davos with Bloomberg News related to growing concerns about rising wealth inequality and its corruption influence on American politics economist and NYU business professor Nouriel Roubini stated as a matter of fact that it would be hard for the US to overcome wealth inequality because the US political system was based on “legalized corruption” which meant rich people – having more resources to bribe politicians with – would generally prevail.

Tom Keene, Bloomberg: How big is the plutocracy effect in 2015?

Nouriel Roubini: It’s significant because we are in a democracy where it supposedly has to be one man, one vote, but the reality is that those who are billionaires, those that have economic and financial power can affect legislation on taxation of capital gains, of carried interest by having that political power.

In the US we have a system of legalized corruption if you think about it. K Street and the lobbying affect legislation with the money they give the politician and therefore those who have financial resources have a greater impact on the political system than those who have less. So it’s not a true democracy, it’s a plutocracy.


This is not news to anyone paying attention. In fact, Princeton University produced an exhaustive study that made headlines demonstrating that the wealthy ultimately determine legislative outcomes in the US Congress. Add to that an experiment the progressive group CREDO and UC Berkeley ran where they offered meetings to representatives with either actual constituents or non-constituent donors with the representatives overwhelmingly choosing the donors and you certainly have a picture of a cynical system run on cash.

CONTINUED w/links...

http://news.firedoglake.com/2015/01/21/taken-for-granted-at-davos-that-us-government-run-on-legalized-corruption/#at_pco=cfd-1.0&at_ab=-&at_pos=7&at_tot=8&at_si=54c5412562e4586b


Wonder if they have a way of giving an empirical measurement to what people don't know?

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Reply #31)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 03:05 PM

50. Yet many make far below the average.

 

Sad how little most make.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:03 PM

12. the real issue

 

The real problem with education is we do underpay teachers and have for many years. Everyone complains that education has gone down. The hidden problem is back in the day women only had 3 options teacher,secretary and nurse. As soon as women entered the workforce education went down.

We were not getting good talent anymore because the top people were going to higher paying jobs. For about 40 years we have been getting substandard talent. We have to pay competitive wages with business and flush out the mediocre talent we now have in the schools.
We also have to have a longer school year. 180 days is just not enough.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:11 PM

16. the problem is that kind of crap has been repeated regularly on

1200 radio stations for 25 years, along with any other anti-public education andti-teacher anti-union lies the think tanks feed the carnival barkers.

the absurd thing about that whole defund and privatize effort that has been so successful is that it probably wouldn't be possible without the help of these 90 major universities.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:11 PM

17. It can be a decent living depending on location

Salary range is 37k-60k with defined step raises for a K-12 teacher here in this county and it's among the lowest in the state. It's a poor rural county though, median household income is around $25,000, so that salary goes much farther as far as housing and taxes than in a more expensive city.

In a large city 100 miles away from here the salary range is 39-66k, property taxes are 3x as much and housing is at least double so it's a lower standard of living on a higher pay scale.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:26 PM

18. OK. All of you who think that single-payer insurance would cost too much.

Read the OP.

And then think.

What would happen if for-profit companies delivered education to our children the way they do healthcare to all of us?

Think how high education costs would rise if we had a number of companies with highly paid executives and lots of private bureaucracy and profit standing between our children and their teachers.

What if every school had to handle the billing processes of a number of different insurance companies? How much additional staff would that add, how much additional money would it cost to support for-profit schools to deal with the number of students that our socialist public schools instruct?

And the idea that private schools are necessarily better than public ones is baloney. My daughter attended public Magnet schools, was in a college study group with girls who had attended expensive private schools. They were studying chemistry. Guess who had the best high school chemistry teacher? Guess who got the best grade and generally got the best grades in college? You guessed it.

Public education paid for by all of us is the most cost-efficient, effective education.

And guess what? My children who attended public schools got the bonus of attending schools with children from different backgrounds, different races, ethnicities, languages -- a perfect preparation for working in the real world.

If we move to single payer, we will insure everyone and save money per insured. There is no way that single payer will cost us per insured person what our current insurance costs.

What may add to the expense is insuring everyone. But even that will not add as much as we might think. And what kind of person thinks that some people should go without health insurance?

I'd hate to think what kind of person that would be. But when you say that we cannot have single payer insurance, that is effectively what you mean and what you are saying and the kind of person you are.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JDPriestly (Reply #18)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 07:46 AM

30. Huge +1!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to JDPriestly (Reply #18)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 12:22 PM

44. +2

The greedheads are out of control. Unlike in the fable, the goose that laid the golden eggs is public education. Like the fable, once dead, the crooks' goose gets cooked, too.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:30 PM

19. Awesome!

This post is someone's attempt to make funny faces at a restaurant to see how many looks they would get from others.

It worked, CONGRATULATION!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:30 PM

20. No, I think we should cap the salaries of CEO's and other execs and direct that

money into the salaries of people who actually CONTRIBUTE to society. Teachers are woefully underpaid if you ask me.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:35 PM

21. It all depends on cost of living. Income taxes should factor in geographical cost of living as well

 

n/t

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:42 PM

22. FU to you

 

who think teachers should be paid minimum wage.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Jenny_92808 (Reply #22)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:56 PM

24. please read the op

They are paid WAY BELOW minimum now..

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to annabanana (Reply #24)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 07:23 PM

26. Why do people comment on things they don't read?

They must've had bad, overpaid teachers.

😜

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 06:51 PM

23. First the definitions have to be agreed upon or no deal

 

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 09:57 PM

27. The best job would be working for the city as a

water treatment plant worker or a traffic engineer.

You could make $ 3 an hour for everyone in the city who gets water from your plant or $ 3 an hour for every car who stops at your stoplights and stop signs.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 09:58 PM

28. I've never met a highly paid teacher, police officer or fire fighter in my life.

 

Many times just the opposite, a lot of volunteering from those three groups SANS pay.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Rex (Reply #28)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 08:30 AM

32. I know a DC cop who makes $125K, and a DC teacher who makes the same

I consider that highly paid, personally.

Note that I'm not claiming they don't deserve it, just that that is 3 times the median income in that city. Which is "highly paid".

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Recursion (Reply #32)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 02:49 PM

49. I never met a teacher, cop or firefighter that made $125k and I bet I am older then you are.

 

Your two in a million example is not very impressive.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sat Jan 30, 2016, 10:06 PM

29. Given the pay and the BS they have to put up with

 

I can't imagine anyone who doesn't genuinely love to teach being a teacher these days.

And a good teacher is worth his or her weight in gold.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to hifiguy (Reply #29)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 03:20 PM

51. Agreed

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 10:05 AM

35. AND highly-paid libarians, social workers, janitors, garbage collectors, sales clerks,

the list goes on and on. They all either raise my taxes or the cost of the goods I buy.

Thank God for CEO's who do their best to make by life bearable and do not ask for more money while they do it.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 10:28 AM

36. My problem with education spending in Oklahoma is the fact

that existing education dollars is not being used wisely to begin with. Okahoma needs to work on consolidating school systems to reduce Administrative and utility costs. There are around 537 School Districts of which around 60% or more are in communities with populations less then 3,000. I recently did some research on it in order to do a reply to a local new article on the push for a penny increase in the sales tax. I am at home and don't have the link to the website I used readily available.

The State of OKlahoma could hand over every penny of state revenue to Education and they would still not be happy. There is no amount of money that will ever make them happy. The reality of life is that a state only has X amount of money to cover what needs to me covered. Every entity has to learn to manage their budget wisely. Consolidating school districts would make more funds available for the classroom.

State pension funds is a sore subject here as well. It is a fact that the teachers are draining their fund at a faster rate then the rate that state employees draw on their retirement fund. Every year or so the state legislature will talk about combining the two finds and, as you can imagine, the reaction of state employees is HELL NO! We don't want the teachers anywhere near our retirement fund. I think what has prevented it from happening so far is the fact that the State Legislators' retirement is part of our retirement fund. Combining the funds would hurt their retirement as much as ours.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 11:10 AM

37. Where? lol

I have yet to meet a teacher who is paid what they are worth. Thankless job, low pay, and now trying to break their unions.

K&R for the post.

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 12:09 PM

42. 18 years, 1500 students/year

And I just cracked 50K

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 12:42 PM

47. Well it's not like education is as important as stock speculation or oil drilling

... oh wait ...



Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to DirkGently (Reply #47)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 12:56 PM

48. +1

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink


Response to Bubzer (Original post)

Sun Jan 31, 2016, 03:24 PM

52. My teacher friend spends a whole lot of her own money on her students!!

Reply to this post

Back to top Alert abuse Link here Permalink

Reply to this thread