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Sun Dec 25, 2016, 05:35 AM

Come 2018, driver licenses from nine states wont be accepted as IDs at the airport

Signs have already begun to pop up at airports across the country: If you live in nine particular states and are counting on your driver license to get you through security, you’ll soon be left grounded.

Thanks to a federal law passed in 2005, residents of Kentucky, Maine, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina and Washington will need another form of identification to present to the Transportation Security Administration at airports effective Jan. 22, 2018.

The REAL ID act, which was passed with bipartisan support, requires certain security measures to be taken, including a broadened measure of basic information included on ID cards, a “common machine-readable technology, with defined minimum data elements” and anti-fraud measures for the people issuing IDs.

While the law does not compel states to change their process or standards for ID cards, it does require that federal organizations reject any IDs from non-compliant states, which would include domestic air travel.

Read more here: http://www.kansas.com/news/nation-world/national/article122744239.html

73 replies, 8988 views

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Arrow 73 replies Author Time Post
Reply Come 2018, driver licenses from nine states wont be accepted as IDs at the airport (Original post)
TexasTowelie Dec 2016 OP
raccoon Dec 2016 #1
TexasTowelie Dec 2016 #19
greymattermom Dec 2016 #2
pintobean Dec 2016 #10
Freddie Dec 2016 #3
Callmecrazy Dec 2016 #59
dumbcat Dec 2016 #65
Callmecrazy Dec 2016 #66
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #4
yeoman6987 Dec 2016 #5
KittyWampus Dec 2016 #9
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #11
KittyWampus Dec 2016 #13
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #14
Ilsa Dec 2016 #15
pnwmom Dec 2016 #23
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #25
pnwmom Dec 2016 #26
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #28
pnwmom Dec 2016 #29
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #38
pnwmom Dec 2016 #41
pnwmom Dec 2016 #61
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #62
tammywammy Dec 2016 #39
pnwmom Dec 2016 #60
Horse with no Name Dec 2016 #64
tammywammy Dec 2016 #68
pnwmom Dec 2016 #27
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #31
pnwmom Dec 2016 #34
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #35
pnwmom Dec 2016 #42
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #43
kcr Dec 2016 #71
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #72
raccoon Dec 2016 #37
crazycatlady Dec 2016 #45
duffyduff Dec 2016 #48
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #56
doc03 Dec 2016 #46
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #57
pangaia Dec 2016 #32
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #40
NobodyHere Dec 2016 #52
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #58
NobodyHere Dec 2016 #63
Grey Lemercier Dec 2016 #70
Buckeye_Democrat Dec 2016 #6
Krytan11c Dec 2016 #16
former9thward Dec 2016 #17
Buckeye_Democrat Dec 2016 #21
pnwmom Dec 2016 #24
Coventina Dec 2016 #73
Historic NY Dec 2016 #7
HeartachesNhangovers Dec 2016 #8
Wounded Bear Dec 2016 #22
pintobean Dec 2016 #12
former9thward Dec 2016 #18
dembotoz Dec 2016 #20
0rganism Dec 2016 #30
pangaia Dec 2016 #33
0rganism Dec 2016 #49
brooklynite Dec 2016 #36
Name removed Dec 2016 #44
doc03 Dec 2016 #47
fescuerescue Dec 2016 #50
Johnathan146 Dec 2016 #53
fescuerescue Dec 2016 #69
PoindexterOglethorpe Dec 2016 #51
dflprincess Dec 2016 #54
Afromania Dec 2016 #55
MarkCross7 Dec 2016 #67

Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 07:12 AM

1. Thanks for posting. My state is among those listed.

I've got a passport, but I think this is ridiculous.

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Response to raccoon (Reply #1)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 03:42 PM

19. You're welcome.

I don't have a passport, but I don't expect to be flying anywhere either. It's been about 15 years since I last flew for a business trip to Florida.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 08:06 AM

2. so people in those states voted, right?

and some of those states required id to vote?
So, the id required for id to vote won't be good enough to fly.
Will anyone in those states be able to vote?

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Response to greymattermom (Reply #2)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 01:55 PM

10. Yes. Voting is a state function.

 

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 09:16 AM

3. Infuriating

PA actually passed a law in 2011 (sponsored by Republicans, when asswipe Corbett was Gov) mandating non-cooperation with the law, stating objections to a "national ID database" and the costs involved. So now I have to spend $150+ on a passport to visit my son in Florida!

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Response to Freddie (Reply #3)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 02:00 AM

59. They're $100. And good for ten years. Nt

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Response to Callmecrazy (Reply #59)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 04:35 PM

65. No, they are not

They are $110 for a renewal, plus the passport photo and the postage to the Dept of State address. I just did mine this month.

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Response to dumbcat (Reply #65)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 05:11 PM

66. My mistake...

I got mine ten years ago and that's what I paid.

And by the way, according to federal law, you are not required to present ID to board a plane. Check the Code of Federal Regulations for commercial aviation. Available online.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 10:00 AM

4. I have zero problem with this. Everyone should have a passport, especially

 

if you fly.

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #4)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 10:15 AM

5. I have a passport, but I wonder if from Florida, you visit relatives in Pennsylvania,

 

will you need a passport for return flight to Florida? I think everyone should just get a passport too.

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #4)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 01:52 PM

9. Passports are expensive and time consuming.

 

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Response to KittyWampus (Reply #9)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 01:57 PM

11. I dont know any adult here who doesn't have one, there is no way to travel internationally without i

 

Also, this OP is about flying, so if you can afford to fly you certainly can afford a passport.

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #11)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 02:00 PM

13. a lot of people can barely afford to fly to see family across country.

 

You shouldn't need a passport to fly in your own country.

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Response to KittyWampus (Reply #13)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 02:13 PM

14. we will have to agree to disagree, if a state refuses to comply with security mandates, then you

 

have to get a passport. Everyone should have one anyway, as why would you want to negate the option of travel outside the US. You can get a United States Passport Card, which is only good in Bermuda, Canada, Mexico and some Caribbean countries, but is valid for domestic air travel inside the United States for only 30 USD.

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Response to KittyWampus (Reply #13)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 02:14 PM

15. I agree with you KW. I don't have one.

Long ago, I could fly to Cosumel Mexico, Dominican Republic, USVI etc with a picture ID and birth certificate, no passport. I've never had one. Shouldn't need one for travel in US.

I'll work on boycotting those states.

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #11)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 07:22 PM

23. So if a family of 4 is flying, you think they can definitely afford 4 passports?

You're wrong.

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #23)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 07:31 PM

25. United States Passport Card for only 30 USD

 

It is, as a bottom line, a security thing. If these states want to opt out, then their ID's are not up to par security wise, so then, yes, you want to fly, sorry, you have to get an ID that complies.

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #25)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 07:32 PM

26. The cost of a passport is $110 for each adult. The card isn't usable within the US.

And people without them will have to order birth certificates, the cost of which varies by state.

https://travel.state.gov/content/dam/passports/FeeChart/Passport%20Fees%20Chart_TSG%20March2016.pdf

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #26)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 07:41 PM

28. you are wrong, the Card is good for domestic USA flights

 

it is RealID compliant

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #28)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 07:50 PM

29. Then you should tell the State Department.

First-time Adult Passport Card
A passport card is valid only for travel by land and by sea to the following locations: Canada, Mexico, Bermuda, and the Caribbean.

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #29)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 08:31 PM

38. you are misreading it

 

https://www.tsa.gov/sites/default/files/resources/realid_factsheet.pdf

3.Prepare for the checkpoint: If you are concerned that your state-issued driver’s license or photo ID may not be accepted by TSA
beginning January 22, 2018, apply for an alternative identification document well ahead of your planned travel dates. Ensure you have
an acceptable ID and boarding pass ready before arriving at the airport. Refer to the current list of acceptable IDs below or at
tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/identification:
• Driver’s licenses or other state photo identity cards issued by Department of Motor Vehicles (or equivalent) in accordance with REAL
ID enforcement schedule described above.
• U.S. passport
• U.S. passport card
• DHS trusted traveler cards (Global Entry, NEXUS, SENTRI, FAST)
• U.S. military ID (active duty or retired military and their dependents, and DoD civilians)
• Permanent resident card
• Border crossing card
• DHS-designated enhanced driver’s license
• Airline or airport-issued ID (if issued under a TSA-approved security plan)
• Federally recognized, tribal-issued photo ID
• HSPD-12 PIV card
• Foreign government-issued passport
• Canadian provincial driver’s license or Indian and Northern Affairs Canada card
• Transportation worker identification credential
• U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services Employment Authorization Card (I-766)


http://ttr.sandia.gov/forms/acceptableformsofidentification.pdf

REAL ID Act
List of Acceptable Forms of Identification
The following information is extracted from REAL ID Act of 2005 Implementation: An Interagency
Security Committee Guide. It is intended to provide options for consideration regarding
acceptable forms of identification. For access to Sandia-controlled premises, DOE is the authority
for determining which identification documents are acceptable, and not all of the documents
below may necessarily be approved by DOE. This list is neither authoritative nor exhaustive and is
subject to change at any time in accordance with DOE direction.
1) Federally-issued Identification
a. U.S. Passport
b. U.S. Passport Card
c. PIV or Federally-issued Personal Identification Verification – Interoperable (PIV-I)
Cards
d. Driver’s License issued by the U.S. Department of State
e. Border Crossing Card (Form DSP-150)
f. DHS “Trusted Traveler” Cards (Global Entry, NEXUS, SENTRI, FAST)
g. U.S. Military ID (all members of the U.S. Armed Forces [including retirees and
dependent ID card holders]) and veterans.
h. Veterans Health Identification Card issued by the U. S. Department of Veterans
Affairs
i. U.S. Permanent Resident Card (Form I-551)
j. U.S. Certificate of Naturalization or Certificate of Citizenship (Form N-550)
k. Employment Authorization Document issued by DHS (Form I-766)
l. U.S. Refugee Travel Document or other travel document or evidence of immigration
status issued by DHS containing a photograph (Permit to Re-enter Form I-327 and
Refugee Travel Document Form I-571)
m. Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC)
n. Merchant Mariner Card issued by DHS/United States Coast Guard (USCG)

snip



https://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/passports/information/card.html

Yes, the passport card has a vicinity-read radio frequency identification (RFID) chip. The RFID technology used in the passport card enables a unique number in the card to be read at a distance by an authorized U.S. Customs and Border Protection reader mounted alongside the traffic lane.

The chip contains no biographic data. It has a unique number linking the card to a secure database maintained by Department of Homeland Security and Department of State.

Even though the chip contains no biographical data, the passport card comes with a sleeve that prevents the unique number from being read when the card is not in use.


snip


here is the Real ID Act itself
https://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/real-id-act-text.pdf

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #38)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 08:42 PM

41. I didn't misread it. Whoever wrote that page wrote an overly abridged description. n/t

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #38)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 03:55 AM

61. TSA staff all over the country have misread that passport card language

in exactly the same way -- that is, to mean what it says.


http://flyingwithfish.boardingarea.com/2013/04/20/the-u-s-passport-card-identification-anomaly/

The U.S. Passport Card Identification Anomaly

April 20, 2013 by flyingfish 24 Comments

Today marks the tenth time I have used my United States Passport Card as identification while flying a domestic flight rather than my drivers’ license since I received it this past February. Today also marks the fourth time a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Transportation Security Officer (TSO) checking identification and board documents has looked up at me and told me they needed a valid form of government issued identification, such as a drivers license or … wait for it … a passport.

The U.S. Passport Card, like a conventional passport, is issued by the United States Department of State for international travel, although it has limitations. The U.S. Passport card is “Valid only for international land and sea travel between United States, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean and Bermuda,” however it is a valid U.S. government issued piece of identification for all domestic purposes … after all it proves my identity and citizenship as a United States Passport.

The TSA TSO who first refused my U.S. Passport Card was at Los Angeles International Airport, who told me he could not accept it, as U.S. Passport Cards are valid for land and sea travel only. That said, I was traveling from Los Angeles to New York, a domestic flight where a passport is not required and proof of citizenship isn’t required. After a brief back and forth the TSO asked his supervisor to look at the Passport Card and it was accepted as valid identification.

The second time my passport card was refused was at Honolulu International Airport, and I’d almost give the TSO a pass on this. The TSO told me she had never seen one before, which is understandable due to Hawaii’s geographic location. The statistical number of Passport Card issued in Hawaii is probably lower than anywhere else in the United States.

The third issue with a TSO no initially accepting my U.S. Passport Card was at New York’s JFK Airport Terminal 3, where I have used it more than anywhere else. The TSO informed me that the identification looked fake. He’d never heard of a Passport Card or seen one. This TSO summoned over his supervisor because he wanted to have the police get involved over the use of a fake Federally issued identification. Obviously that never happened, the Supervisor informed him that U.S. Passport Cards were valid and a legitimate form of identification.

SNIP

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #61)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 04:09 AM

62. that article is almost 4 years old, the cards have only been around for 6 years, and as the deadline

 

approaches, I am sure the TSA training will be better, if it is not already.

The simpler thing is for the 9 states to get their cards in line with the other 41. Some of the 9 have options to get an enhanced ID/DL, so there's that too. The basic underpinnings of a lot of the federalism and state-centric things (the EC for one) in the US constitutional government's apparatus are being exposed as shopworn and open for abuse and gaming of the system by a tyranny of a united minority. If you think its bad now, wait until 4 to 8 years of Rethug dominance (Real ID was bi-partisan, btw) of the vast majority of state houses, statewide elected offices, state governorships, combined with a sweeping RW control of all 3 parts of US federal government.

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #29)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 08:38 PM

39. The passport card is acceptable for domestic air travel

But unacceptable for international air travel. It's listed by the TSA as acceptable form of identification: https://www.tsa.gov/travel/security-screening/identification


And from the State Dept https://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/news/real-id-not-needed-for-domestic-flights-until-2018.html

Right now, no individual needs to adjust travel plans, or rush out to get a new driver’s license or a passport for domestic air travel. Until January 22, 2018, residents of all states will still be able to use a state-issued driver’s license or identification card for domestic air travel. Passengers can also continue to use any of the various other forms of identification accepted by TSA (such as a Passport or Passport Card, Global Entry card, U.S. military ID, airline or airport-issued ID, federally recognized tribal-issued photo ID).

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Response to tammywammy (Reply #39)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 03:51 AM

60. Anyone who tries to use it for domestic travel might have trouble at the TSA,

despite that verbiage.

http://flyingwithfish.boardingarea.com/2013/04/20/the-u-s-passport-card-identification-anomaly/

The U.S. Passport Card Identification Anomaly

April 20, 2013 by flyingfish 24 Comments

Today marks the tenth time I have used my United States Passport Card as identification while flying a domestic flight rather than my drivers’ license since I received it this past February. Today also marks the fourth time a Transportation Security Administration (TSA) Transportation Security Officer (TSO) checking identification and board documents has looked up at me and told me they needed a valid form of government issued identification, such as a drivers license or … wait for it … a passport.

The U.S. Passport Card, like a conventional passport, is issued by the United States Department of State for international travel, although it has limitations. The U.S. Passport card is “Valid only for international land and sea travel between United States, Canada, Mexico, the Caribbean and Bermuda,” however it is a valid U.S. government issued piece of identification for all domestic purposes … after all it proves my identity and citizenship as a United States Passport.

The TSA TSO who first refused my U.S. Passport Card was at Los Angeles International Airport, who told me he could not accept it, as U.S. Passport Cards are valid for land and sea travel only. That said, I was traveling from Los Angeles to New York, a domestic flight where a passport is not required and proof of citizenship isn’t required. After a brief back and forth the TSO asked his supervisor to look at the Passport Card and it was accepted as valid identification.

The second time my passport card was refused was at Honolulu International Airport, and I’d almost give the TSO a pass on this. The TSO told me she had never seen one before, which is understandable due to Hawaii’s geographic location. The statistical number of Passport Card issued in Hawaii is probably lower than anywhere else in the United States.

The third issue with a TSO no initially accepting my U.S. Passport Card was at New York’s JFK Airport Terminal 3, where I have used it more than anywhere else. The TSO informed me that the identification looked fake. He’d never heard of a Passport Card or seen one. This TSO summoned over his supervisor because he wanted to have the police get involved over the use of a fake Federally issued identification. Obviously that never happened, the Supervisor informed him that U.S. Passport Cards were valid and a legitimate form of identification.

SNIP

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #25)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 03:43 PM

64. You realize that (rightfully so) minor children that are involved in divorce

cannot get passports unless both parents agree. That is impossible in many situations.
So...you advocate children in this situation not be allowed to fly?

Interesting view.

I rarely read that we need MORE restriction on traveling on this website.

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Response to Horse with no Name (Reply #64)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 07:18 PM

68. Minors (under 18) are not required to have ID for air travel.

Q: Will minors need to have driver’s licenses to fly domestically?

TSA does not require children under 18 to provide identification when traveling with a companion within the United States. The companion will need acceptable identification.


https://www.dhs.gov/real-id-public-faqs

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #11)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 07:35 PM

27. Your elitism is showing. Less than half of Americans have a passport

or even a passport card (which allows travel only to limited locations, such as Canada.)

http://www.theexpeditioner.com/2010/02/17/how-many-americans-have-a-passport-2/

The quick answer is that yes, the majority of Americans do not have a passport. The percentage of Americans who have a valid passport, according to the most recent statistics as tabulated by the State Department, is about 46%. This number excludes passport cards, which are identification cards that only allow sea and overland entry to the U.S. from Canada, Mexico and certain parts of the Caribbean, but not the rest of the world.

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #27)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 07:54 PM

31. It is not elitism, it is about security, if a state ID or DL is not compliant, then come 2018

 

a person needs to have a compliant ID. We are only talking about 9 states atm that refuse fully or partially with the requirements. I suggest people there petition their state to adopt a compliant ID.

Flying is not a right.

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #31)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 08:09 PM

34. It shows elitism when you say that everyone has a passport.

The majority of Americans don't.

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #34)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 08:15 PM

35. the vast majority of US citizens also have Real ID compliant state ID/DL, and if they do not have it

 

then they will have to get it if they wish to fly. They have had years upon years to sort this out, and still have over a year to go.

I live in London, I am a dual citizen, so if that makes me "elitist" then I do not know what to say. Every adult I know has at least one passport, and many of these are far from wealthy individuals. It is far from unfair to make a universal security requirement to fly.

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #35)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 08:44 PM

42. You're elitist if you assume that because everyone you know has passports,

then everyone does. Only 46% of Americans have a passport book or a passport card.

Till now, flying from New York to California hasn't been like traveling from England to France. We haven't required international passports to travel by plane from state to state.

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Response to pnwmom (Reply #42)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 08:56 PM

43. and you still do not, you simply need a Real ID compliant form of identification, which all of 9

 

states now have in the form of their state ID/DL's. People residing in those 9 states need to take it up with the state government, or simply comply with an acceptable form of ID by other means. The bi-partisan national law was passed, and it has been given years to be adopted by the states. It is a matter of security for travel within the US.

A comparison of people I know based on where I live is hardly a priori elitist, it simply shows cultural and governmental compliance differences of one location versus another.

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #43)

Tue Dec 27, 2016, 03:24 AM

71. If everyone you know has passports, you are not typical of most people in the US

You are on a website where a lot of people lean Dem/progressive, and Real ID is not popular. That's why you're getting some guff. You might be fine with it personally as a matter of security. You're entitled to your opinion, but factually speaking there's nothing about Real ID that makes any of us safer.

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Response to kcr (Reply #71)

Tue Dec 27, 2016, 03:42 AM

72. Real ID was passed with overwhelming bi-partisan support

 

13 years ago. I am a dual citizen who lives in London. Biometric ID's are standard EU wide and in most USA states as well. They definitely add an extra layer of security. It's funny you to frame it as a non progressive issue, when the main resistance has mostly historically come from the far right and also the tin foil hat conspiracy crowd, ie. Alex Jones and his flock of chemtrail/FEMA camp loons and like-minded ilk, plus Sovereign Citizens, militia groups, and Bundy types as well.

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #11)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 08:22 PM

37. I know plenty of people who don't. nt

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #11)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 10:38 PM

45. I'm an adult without a passport

I had one as a child, but it expired when I was in high school (90s). I never renewed it. Renewing it would set me back time and money that I would rather not spend when international travel is not in my immediate future. Should I make travel plans to leave the country, then I'll get one. But until then, I'd rather spend the almost $200 on something else.

I was last on a plane 6 weeks ago and used a drivers license to board. I can fill out employment paperwork with my DL and SS card or birth certificate.

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #11)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 11:08 PM

48. Most people can't afford one. It is also expensive to renew. n/t

 

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Response to duffyduff (Reply #48)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 01:08 AM

56. A Passport Card is 30 usd and is good for ten years, a full

 

Passport is 110 usd and good for 10 years. 15 year olds and under get them for 15 usd and 80 usd. Your statement of "most people can't afford that" is not valid. You are implying that 170 to 200 million or more Americans cannot afford that (as "most" means far over a majority). The USA is not Chad or Malawi or some other impoverished nation.

Also, close to 90% or so of Americans live in states where a simple state ID or DL is sufficient to fly domestically. I am fairly certain many of the 9 remaining states will come around after enough pressure is applied to them. The Real ID Act was non partisan and people will have had 13 years to comply. That is long enough. It's necessary for security.

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Response to KittyWampus (Reply #9)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 10:57 PM

46. It took me about 5 minutes to get a passport but it did cost

about $150 I think. The cost would be a problem for many people.

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Response to doc03 (Reply #46)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 01:12 AM

57. A passport card is 30 usd and good for 10 years. It is Real ID compliant.

 

90% of people dont even need that as their state ID or DL is Real ID compliant.

We are talking about flying here, which is expensive in and of itself, plus it is not a right.

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #4)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 08:05 PM

32. Why?

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Response to pangaia (Reply #32)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 08:41 PM

40. enhanced security, option to leave the country, international travel is good for overall quality of

 

life, etc.

I understand that people who actually reside in the US have much less desire, on average, to travel internationally than most other industrialised nations, but I think it is entirely healthy for the country at large if more so did go and see how the rest of the world is.

If a person is too old or ill to travel abroad, then yes, they do not need a passport, but IF they wish to fly, they will need Real ID compliant ID (such as the 30 usd US Passport Card) in 13 months or so, and for security purposes, they will have to get it, if those 9 stubborn states refuse to upgrade. It is just part of the overarching federal security system that was voted in by both parties.

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #4)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 11:41 PM

52. What problem exactly does this law solve?

 

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Response to NobodyHere (Reply #52)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 01:17 AM

58. Real ID makes it dramatically harder to board a plane with

 

a fraudulent ID and or if you are a potential threat. It is all about security, which is unfortunately a paramount concern today. It was passed with huge bi-partisan support almost 12 years ago.

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Response to Grey Lemercier (Reply #58)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 03:37 PM

63. Are people illegally boarding planes now? It is worth the bureaucratic hastle?

 

Seems to me that things were working fine before the law was passed.

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Response to NobodyHere (Reply #63)

Tue Dec 27, 2016, 02:56 AM

70. Ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure nt

 

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 10:51 AM

6. I'm surprised that Arizona isn't included, given that...

their state driver's licenses last for 25 years!

It strikes me as unlikely that licenses from Arizona that are about to finally expire would be compliant with any new security measures, but maybe I'm wrong?

I found out about the 25 year duration a few years ago while attending a conference about Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum (PXE), a genetic condition that causes early blindness and other problems.

I talked to the actress, Jessica Harper, and her brother Charles. Both of them have PXE like me.

Charles showed me his still-active AZ driver's license despite his legal blindness. Jessica, also legally blind, was upset and demanded that Charles give her the license so she could destroy it! He said that he didn't use it to drive anymore, but she still wanted it! He laughed as he held it high above her so she couldn't reach it. She also had trouble seeing where he was holding it, obviously. They acted like young siblings bickering over something that they both wanted!

Jessica's IMDb page: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0363888/

Her brother was a hoot!

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Response to Buckeye_Democrat (Reply #6)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 02:23 PM

16. Did it change?

As far as I knew it lasts until you're 65 here in AZ.

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Response to Buckeye_Democrat (Reply #6)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 03:26 PM

17. AZ passed a real ID law for licenses a couple of years ago.

Anyone can get a new license at any DMV site.

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Response to former9thward (Reply #17)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 07:14 PM

21. Ah! I bet he lost his license when that happened.

He showed me his AZ driver's license about 8 to 10 years ago, I think, and it wasn't due to expire for many more years. His sister was upset that he still had a driver's license since he was legally blind at the time, like her.

I'm assuming that Arizona required everyone to complete a new vision test when they issued the new "real ID" driver's licenses?

Ohio requires a vision test with each new license, and they only last 4 years at a time.

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Response to former9thward (Reply #17)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 07:24 PM

24. Only if they bring a copy of their birth certificate. And some people

don't have transportation to the DMV. Mine isn't on a bus line, which would affect people dependent on public transportation.

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Response to former9thward (Reply #17)

Tue Dec 27, 2016, 04:04 AM

73. My new license is stamped "not valid for federal identification "

They did not even give me the option of obtaining this so-called "real I.d."

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 10:57 AM

7. Thirteen years wasn't long enough.....

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 01:49 PM

8. Washington State offers 2 different drivers licenses.

The "enhanced" license - which costs a bit more & requires additional documentation - WILL work for flying domestically in the future. My wife and I got these this year.

Since the writer of the article doesn't know this about WA state, it's possible that some or all of the other states listed also have a similar option.

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Response to HeartachesNhangovers (Reply #8)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 07:19 PM

22. Me, too, and just renewed...

"a bit more" is kind of understated, it is double the price. Since we go for 6 years at a pop, the diff for me was about $58, which I didn't have, living on a fixed income. Thankfully, I can upgrade later, at only the diference in price, which I will probably in 2017 some time, as I have family in California and am getting a bit old to drive.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 02:00 PM

12. If the people in those states won't be able to fly

 

they'll have no need for their airports. Things could get pretty ugly.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 03:28 PM

18. This gets posted every year or so.

And the date gets extended every year or so. That is why those states have not complied with the law. It will get extended again and they know it.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 03:45 PM

20. It will be fun to see the family on the way to Disney stopping the airport lines

Cause the parents who fly once a decade or so find out the family needs enhanced I'd to get on a plane.

Screaming kids, angry parents...If they are black they will probably get shot...
Fun fun fun

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 07:53 PM

30. what happens if we fly to one of those states from a state that doesn't require said ID?

do we need passports for interstate travel now?

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Response to 0rganism (Reply #30)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 08:08 PM

33. You can't leave. So you are stuck there the rest of your life.



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Response to pangaia (Reply #33)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 11:23 PM

49. you can check out any time you like...

but you can never leeeeeeaaave

welcome to the hotel Minnesota

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 08:22 PM

36. How will Trump handle the conflict...

...between his anti-terrorist mantra, and pissing off people in States that voted for him?

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)


Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 11:02 PM

47. A guy bought beer a couple days ago at the carryout. The lady that carded him said he had 4 drivers

licenses from 4 different states. I am wondering if he could vote in 4 states. He was one of the guest workers
that work on the drilling rigs and pipelines. They are mostly from the western or southern states..

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 11:33 PM

50. Trump's first step to restricting interstate travel

"Papers" please at all the borders.

Is this something that Obama can stop before Trump implements it?

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Response to fescuerescue (Reply #50)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 11:49 PM

53. The real ID act was passed in 2005

 

I'm not sure what this has to to with Trump. Obama has had 8 years to repeal it if he wanted too.

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Response to Johnathan146 (Reply #53)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 09:46 PM

69. OBama still has time.

Someone has to do something

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Sun Dec 25, 2016, 11:40 PM

51. My state, New Mexico, only recently decided to co-operate with the Real ID bullshit.

Because it IS just bullshit, just as every other "security" nonsense since September 11, 2001, is pure theater.

I'm speaking as a former airline employee who started working at a major east coast airport several years before any security whatsoever. The reason the first security screenings were implemented were to stop the almost weekly skyjackings that were occurring by the early 1970's. And it worked. Skyjackings stopped.

Then 9/11 occurred, and we got all this absolute nonsense about not being able to bring knitting needles or embroidery scissors or nail clippers on board. Nail clippers? Really?

So then, in their infinite idiocy, our Congress (or whoever) decided we need some sort of bullet proof drivers' licenses. Sigh.

Here in New Mexico, in the few months since our drivers' licenses conform to the Real ID standards, there have been all sorts of problems. Such as the DMV being unwilling to accept a valid passport as good enough. WTF??? Do they not know what hoops you go through to get a passport?

Luckily for me my DL came up for renewal earlier this year, about a month before the Real ID implementation.

I recently renewed my passport and got the passport card while I was at it. I keep that in my wallet, which means if I need to flee to Canada, Mexico, or the Caribbean suddenly, I'm good to go.

I tend to be of the opinion that everyone should have a passport, but the financial reality for some people is that the cost of one might be out of their financial means, and I've been much poorer than I am now, and so I get that. Someone who has no interest in international travel, even if a passport is affordable, is different. If that someone were a personal friend of mine, I'd try to convince her to get a passport, mainly because I can't imagine not ever travelling out of the country. That's just me.

What is nice about current passports is that they are good for ten years. I think my first passport was only good for five years.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 12:07 AM

54. Minnesota does offer the option of getting an "enhanced" license but it isn't required

it's also a pain in the neck to get.

It's only available at driver's license examining stations which most people only go to when they first get their license. There are other offices, with more convenient hours, where you can can go to renew a regular license.

The enhanced license also costs more and requires more ID and proof of residence than you need to get a passport. In fact, a passport is a piece of ID it's suggested you use to get the enhanced license.

If your concern is being able to fly and you have a passport, just use that. It's all the TSA requires and there's no point to putting yourself through the hassle of getting the license until the the state requires it. Though I personally think it's pathetic that this is being required for travel within the U.S.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 01:04 AM

55. ID

I recommend that people everywhere get as many forms of ID as they can because the Republicans insist on being ill. On the surface of things I don't exactly disagree with the need for national picture ID's. However, being something new there should be more of an allowance of time, and perhaps an federal outlay of money, for people to get the supporting ID's required to get this federal ID.

While the US Passport ID "could" be as little as 30$. It's completely dependent on you already having the corresponding walk up documents. Let's be honest, most people are broke or pretty close to it in this country and digging up the time and money to gather up all of the documents is an undertaking. At each stage of the ID process you are going to require something that either costs money to replace or a document that requires an outlay of money to get.

Birth Certificate = Varies (could just be info on who your parents were, where you were born, etc) or a picture ID, Fee depending on state

Social Security Card = Birth Certificate (cost depends on place of birth), U.S. Government Picture ID(license, state ID , Passport)

Drivers License = Birth Certificate, Social Security Card or a combination of other stuff that may require you have the Birth Certificate or Social Security card, Fee's associated with getting a drivers license

Passport = Birth Certificate(or other early life document), Drivers License (55$-in person 30$-online limited to a few states)

I've helped a few of my older relatives get replacements for lost birth certificates. The costs have been as little as 9$ and as much as 45$. The costs are then further compounded by an individuals ability to travel to the place where they were born. Some places have taken the filing process online, but the vast majority of places still require an in person visit. From there you are outlaying varying amounts of money at each step of the process making the final total for a Passport something considerably more than 30$. From there it becomes even more complicated with the Social Security Card, Drivers License, and Passport requiring at least two of the other forms of ID.

With the exception of the Social Security Card everything else is going to cost something. Each of the ID's requires you have one, or more, of the others. There may be certain situations where the process catch-22 its' self. What happens when you need a replacement Birth Certificate from a place that insists on a drivers license, or other picture ID with signature, as proof; and you can't get the drivers license without the Birth Certificate. This push for federal ID's needs to be streamlined somehow, and free.

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Response to TexasTowelie (Original post)

Mon Dec 26, 2016, 05:19 PM

67. Why are passports so expensive?

Before 9/11 I drove from NY to Detroit threw Canada all the time without a passport.

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