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Tue Jan 25, 2022, 11:49 AM

The backlash against rightwing evangelicals is reshaping American politics and faith

What if I were to tell you that the following trends in American religion were all connected: rising numbers of people who are religiously unaffiliated (“nones”) or identify as “spiritual but not religious”; a spike in positive attention to the “religious left”; the depoliticization of liberal religion; and the purification and radicalization of the religious right? As a sociologist who has studied American religion and politics for many years, I have often struggled to make sense of these dramatic but seemingly disconnected changes. I now believe they all can all be explained, at least in part, as products of a backlash to the religious right.

Since the religious right rose to national prominence in the 1980s, the movement’s insertion of religion in public debate and uncompromising style of public discourse has alienated many non-adherents and members of the larger public. As its critics often note, the movement promotes policies – such as bans on same-sex marriage and abortion – that are viewed by growing numbers of Americans as intolerant and radical.

In a 2002 article, sociologists Michael Hout and Claude S Fischer argued that a significant trend in American religion – the skyrocketing number of people disaffiliating from religion – could be partly explained as a political backlash against the religious right. In the two decades since this article was published, a wealth of additional evidence has emerged to support its general argument. Sociologists Joseph O Baker and Buster G Smith summarize the sentiment driving this backlash: “If that’s what it means to be religious, then I’m not religious.”

While pathbreaking, this research has been relatively narrow in its focus. This is because it has typically started with the puzzle of the rising “nones” and worked backward in search of a cause, landing on backlash against the religious right. I wondered what would happen if we flipped this question around, and started with the rise of the religious right and public concerns about its radicalism. We could then consider the varied ways that backlash against it has manifested, including but not limited to the rise of the “nones”.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/jan/25/the-backlash-against-rightwing-evangelicals-is-reshaping-american-politics-and-faith
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I'm not a "none", I'm an Orthodox Christian, but I'm seriously backlashing!

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Reply The backlash against rightwing evangelicals is reshaping American politics and faith (Original post)
Jilly_in_VA Jan 2022 OP
MiniMe Jan 2022 #1
Skittles Jan 2022 #2
Jilly_in_VA Jan 2022 #3

Response to Jilly_in_VA (Original post)

Tue Jan 25, 2022, 02:12 PM

1. The "Religious Right" is Neither

My favorite Bumper Sticker from the 80's

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Response to Jilly_in_VA (Original post)

Wed Jan 26, 2022, 12:52 AM

2. the "religious right" has always been a bunch of fucking nonsense

what would Jesus think of people people like them? NOT MUCH.

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Response to Jilly_in_VA (Original post)

Wed Jan 26, 2022, 09:19 AM

3. I would love

to see Jesus stalk into one of these megachurches and start throwing tables around. Wouldn't you?

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