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Sat Aug 30, 2014, 04:04 AM

Do it yourself: The $20 lighting kit

http://www.popphoto.com/news/2010/08/do-it-yourself-20-lighting-kit?src=related&con=outbrain&obref=obinsite

So you want be a Photographer, but your budget is tight? You
got to hit us up. We’ll show you
how to make the most out of $20 lights.

One of the biggest challenges both aspiring professional
photographers and amateurs alike face is the steep price of photo gear.

Found this on my FB newsfeed and while many here are well beyond this level, thought it might be useful to some.

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Reply Do it yourself: The $20 lighting kit (Original post)
Sherman A1 Aug 2014 OP
alfredo Aug 2014 #1
Major Nikon Aug 2014 #2
liberal N proud Aug 2014 #3
Stevenmarc Aug 2014 #5
JohnnyRingo Aug 2014 #4

Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 10:22 AM

1. Old microphone stands work well too. I have one with a gooseneck. That one is

quite handy.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 10:37 AM

2. More light is generally better

However the problem with such a setup is that it won't put out very much light. You will need to get these lights very close to your subject to work very well. Fluorescent bulbs are also hard to color correct, especially if you have mixed light sources like the sun or incandescent, and also especially if you use fast shutter speeds.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 12:39 PM

3. Something I learned from a professional photographer

Use foil covered rigid insulation sheets for reflective screens. He uses them on remote shoots because they inexpensive durable and provide perfect reflection for indirect lighting.


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Response to liberal N proud (Reply #3)

Sun Aug 31, 2014, 02:10 PM

5. I've used those in a MacGyver moment

But a quick stop at an auto store for under $10 you can pick up a windshield reflector thingy that are a lot easier to maneuver.

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Response to Sherman A1 (Original post)

Sat Aug 30, 2014, 03:39 PM

4. Some great ideas there.

I don't know if I have a white t-shirt laying around to use as a diffuser, so I may try an old pair of underwear. The sepia tint may add a nice artsy touch. hahaha

Thanx for posting.

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