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Wed Sep 29, 2021, 11:34 AM

Birds, Bees, and Butterflies

We live in the north valley and although they are waning, this year we have had a bumper crop of butterflies. I particularly love the black ones. A lot of bees this year too. Now we have to be on the lookout for Africanized bees as well as mosquitoes due to the increase in the West Nile Virus. As if Covid isn't enough. Oh, yeah, Valley Fever too. On top of that has anybody noticed more dead birds than usual? We had three dead doves in our yard within three days. What's with that? Are they eating seeds tainted with Glyphosate or Paraquat?


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Arrow 11 replies Author Time Post
Reply Birds, Bees, and Butterflies (Original post)
StarryNite Sep 2021 OP
Kali Sep 2021 #1
StarryNite Sep 2021 #4
Kali Sep 2021 #2
StarryNite Sep 2021 #3
Kali Sep 2021 #5
StarryNite Sep 2021 #6
ChazII Sep 2021 #7
StarryNite Oct 2021 #8
Kali Oct 2021 #9
StarryNite Oct 2021 #10
StarryNite Oct 2021 #11

Response to StarryNite (Original post)

Wed Sep 29, 2021, 12:17 PM

1. birds are carriers of West Nile

jays and crows get sick and die, I don't know about doves in particular

zinnias are butterfly magnets! mine are covered all day with them.

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Response to Kali (Reply #1)

Wed Sep 29, 2021, 12:57 PM

4. I planted my zinnias late.

Just as they are beginning to bloom the butterflies are not nearly as plentiful. Go figure.

I read about jays and crows getting West Nile. I never see jays. Occasionally I see ravens which are also corvids and susceptible to the virus.

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Response to StarryNite (Original post)

Wed Sep 29, 2021, 12:35 PM

2. found this from G and F

Virus affects Eurasian collared doves

Almost every year, a virus that affects Eurasian collared doves resurfaces in Arizona. The virus does not threaten human health and affects only this non-native dove species. As a result, you may find dead Eurasian doves on your property. Please dispose of them by wrapping them and putting them in the trash. Do not bury them.

To help stop the virus from spreading, please clean your bird feeder and bird bath regularly.


also avian botulism, which mostly affects water fowl, but doves do drink at ponds and lakes

https://azgfd-portal-wordpress-pantheon.s3.us-west-2.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/archive/Avian-Botulism-2020.pdf

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Response to Kali (Reply #2)

Wed Sep 29, 2021, 12:52 PM

3. Thank you for this.

They were collared doves. I disposed of them correctly. All three are in plastic bags in the garbage. Poor things.

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Response to StarryNite (Reply #3)

Wed Sep 29, 2021, 01:44 PM

5. they are non-native and kind of like friendly flying mice

always plenty of them around, don't worry too much.

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Response to Kali (Reply #5)

Wed Sep 29, 2021, 02:06 PM

6. True, they are non-native...but still.

I guess it's nature's way of keeping the population in check.

More non-natives that I am wild about.

Fred and Ethel

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Response to StarryNite (Reply #6)

Wed Sep 29, 2021, 06:22 PM

7. I saw several of those earlier in the

year but I have not seen them recently. The first time I saw one I though someone pet had flown from its cage.

I am enjoying our cooler weather today.

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Response to ChazII (Reply #7)

Fri Oct 1, 2021, 12:51 PM

8. I don't see them often but I love it when I do.

Still getting cooler weather, fall is in the air. My favorite time of year.

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Response to StarryNite (Reply #6)

Fri Oct 1, 2021, 10:27 PM

9. I remember when they started showing up

early 80s, about the time I left the valley for Tucson. my sister has a ton of them visiting her desert yard in north Tempe.

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Response to Kali (Reply #9)

Mon Oct 4, 2021, 05:33 PM

10. They are so pretty and loud!

It's their sound that gets my attention because it's so different from any of the native birds.

Wild parrots can be spotted in Phoenix neighborhoods

By: Jason VolentinePosted at 10:01 PM, Apr 03, 2018 and last updated 1:59 PM, Apr 04, 2018

Excerpts:

Clark has been tracking lovebird colonies on his website since the 90s.

He said the colonies were most likely started by two big lovebird releases in the 80s. One was an aviary in Apache Junction that released around 100 birds when it was destroyed by a monsoon.

Clark said the other was an aviary in the North Valley where the owner simply threw open the doors when he decided he didn't want the birds anymore.

~snip~

"They are all over Scottsdale. They are all over central Phoenix, and now they're all over Ahwatukee," Clark said.

Technically, they're an invasive species Clark said it's okay to enjoy them because they don't seem to bother the native birds.


[link:https://www.abc15.com/news/region-phoenix-metro/central-phoenix/wild-parrots-can-be-spotted-in-phoenix-neighborhoods|

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Response to Kali (Reply #5)

Mon Oct 4, 2021, 05:37 PM

11. Up to 5 found dead in my yard so far...

I dumped the big birdbath, cleaned, bleached, and put it on the ground empty. But the next morning they were coming for drinks. I felt so bad for them. I put water in two small birdbaths. They are a breeze to clean compared to the big one.

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