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abqtommy

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Member since: Fri Sep 26, 2008, 10:10 PM
Number of posts: 11,860

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Full Moon Fever is coming tomorrow, October 20, 2021, at 8:56 AM U.S.

Mountain Daylight Saving Time.

"October: Hunter's Moon

Every three years, the Hunter's Moon is also the Harvest Moon. Traditionally, people in the Northern Hemisphere spent the month of October preparing for the coming winter by hunting, slaughtering and preserving meats for use as food. This led to October’s Full Moon being called the Hunter’s Moon, Dying Grass Moon, and Blood Moon or Sanguine Moon. However, this should not be confused with a Total Lunar Eclipse – Blood Moon."

https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/moon/full-moon-names.html

I appreciate websites like timeanddate that keep me from being confused so that I
can focus all my attention on the beauty of the moon.

October 17, 1956, Mae Jemison, first African-American woman in space, was born.

From The Good News Network. Here's one of the important things I've learned today so far.

https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/events061017/

"Raised in Chicago, Dr. Jemison earned a degree in chemical engineering along with a medical degree—and learned Russian, Swahili, and Japanese. She was elected to serve as a mission specialist aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour STS-47 launch. She orbited the Earth for nearly eight days on September 12–20, 1992, and conducted a bone cell research experiment during her 127 orbits of Earth.

Jemison was a doctor for the Peace Corps in Liberia and Sierra Leone in the 80s and practiced medicine as a general practitioner, before pursuing becoming an astronaut, and applying to NASA.

Jemison left the agency in 1993 and founded a technology research company, and, later a nonprofit foundation—and appeared in an episode of Star Trek: The Next Generation. She also authored several children’s books, and an autobiography, Find Where the Wind Goes."

There's a bit more text and some great photos at the link.

CBC*: How a Manitoba motorcycle club is changing perceptions of the Sikh faith

*Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

https://newsinteractives.cbc.ca/longform/riding-with-pride

This photo essay has a lot of photos and a lot of text. For me it's a pleasant
distraction from all the doom, gloom and violence I find on my international news
sites even on a Sunday. Who knew? Now I do!

"Rajwinder Singh Sandhu stands in front of a mirror and suits up for an afternoon motorcycle ride through the country roads south of Winnipeg. He winds a fuchsia-coloured turban around his head and slips on a black leather vest adorned with a large blue and yellow patch on the back that identifies him as a member of the Sikh Motorcycle Club of Manitoba.

The club's insignia includes a khanda, a symbol of the Sikh faith and a sign that what unifies him and his fellow motorcycling enthusiasts is more than a love of the open road.

For more than two decades, Sikh riders in Canada have fought for the right to be exempted from the helmet requirement that motorcyclists are obliged to follow so they could wear a turban. In Manitoba, they won that right in 2000, shortly after the first exemption came into effect in B.C. in 1999.

"Whenever we ride wearing turbans, it already gives out a positive message in society, that we are very proud Canadians and part of this society, we are in a free country," said Singh Sandhu, the club's spokesperson."

There's a lot more text and photos at the link above.

From The BBC: Africa's week in pictures: 8-14 October 2021

Here's another photo spread showing the diversity of Africa and Africans. Enjoy!

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-58909966

From The BBC: Your pictures of Scotland: 8-15 October (2021)

Ah, here it is! Another fine group of Scotland photos with pun-laden comments
to serve as a well-needed distraction. Enjoy!

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-58864722

I've been enjoying watching the re-runs of The Ed Sullivan show lately. Last

nights' showing featured a much younger Alan King.

Then today I decided to watch Memories Of Me, the 1988 movie starring Billy Crystal
and (who else?) Alan King. Alan King had what it takes as a younger man and
in 1988 too. I did a quick Wikipedia search and Alan died on May 9, 2004 (aged 76).
Movies and TV guarantee that he won't be forgotten.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_King

From The BBC: 'What if other human species hadn't died out (...)

Would we still see our humanity in the same way if other hominin species – from Australopithecus to Neanderthals – hadn't gone extinct?'

https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20211008-what-if-other-human-species-hadnt-died-out

"In our mythologies, there's often a singular moment when we became "human". Eve plucked the fruit of the Tree of Knowledge and gained awareness of good and evil. Prometheus created men from clay and gave them fire. But in the modern origin story, evolution, there's no defining moment of creation. Instead, humans emerged gradually, generation by generation, from earlier species.

Just like any other complex adaptation – a bird's wing, a whale's fluke, our own fingers – our humanity evolved step by step, over millions of years. Mutations appeared in our DNA, spread through the population, and our ancestors slowly became something more like us and, finally, we appeared.

People are animals, but we're unlike other animals. We have complex languages that let us articulate and communicate ideas. We're creative: we make art, music, tools. Our imaginations let us think up worlds that once existed, dream up worlds that might yet exist, and reorder the external world according to those thoughts. Our social lives are complex networks of families, friends and tribes, linked by a sense of responsibility towards each other. We also have an awareness of ourselves, and our universe: sentience, sapience, consciousness, whatever you call it.

And yet the distinction between ourselves and other animals is, arguably, artificial. Animals are more like humans than we might like to think."

I found this to be a long and thought-provoking read. I especially liked the
information about animals that have much larger brains then humans. Since they
have never mastered the controlled use of fire and the technology that produces
Weapons Of Mass Destruction I have to give them credit for being smarter than us
humans. But then you're free to decide that.

There's much more text and photos at the link above.

CBC*: 5 big leaks of tax-haven records before the Pandora Papers

* Canadian Broadcasting Corporation details previous leaks of tax-haven records.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/offshore-tax-haven-leaks-panama-pandora-paradise-papers-1.6205447

These include:

HSBC Geneva - 2009

HSBC Jersey - 2012

Offshore Leaks - 2013

Panama Papers - 2016

Paradise Papers - 2017

And of course the latest revelation:

Pandora Papers - 2021

Read all about these various revelations. What's missing is a report on how all
the individuals and groups involved have now paid their fair share of taxes and
promise to never do it again.

There's lots more text and photos at the link given above.

How a Mi'kmaw song ended up on an album by world-renowned cellist Yo-Yo Ma

From The CBC/Canadian Broadcasting Corporation...

... https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-scotia/mi-kmaq-honour-song-yo-yo-ma-jeremy-dutcher-1.6202889

"Translated into multiple languages, played with the accompaniment of an array of instruments and performed for audiences around the world — the Mi'kmaw Honor Song has already cemented its place in the history books.

But one new recording is likely to introduce the song to its widest audience yet.

The second track on Notes for the Future, the new album from world-renowned American cellist Yo-Yo Ma, begins with the sound of Ma's trademark instrument. After several long, mellow notes, a voice comes in with the distinct chants that make up the chorus of Honor Song.

It started with a phone call nearly three years ago. Ma was on a worldwide tour performing Johann Sebastian Bach's cello suites. He invited local musicians on stage for guest performances on many of the stops. For his only Canadian concert, in Montreal, he invited Jeremy Dutcher, a young operatic tenor who had just won the Polaris Music Prize for his debut album."

There's lots more text and photos at the link above. I do enjoy these stories of
people doing good/productive things.

From The BBC: Africa's week in pictures: 1-7 October 2021

Here's another great collection of photos of Africa and Africans. Enjoy!

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-58827292
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