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abqtommy

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Member since: Fri Sep 26, 2008, 09:10 PM
Number of posts: 12,912

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The Good News Network Quote Of The Day from Charles Spurgeon, July 31, 2021

“There are times when solitude is better than society, and silence is wiser than speech.”

https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/category/quote-of-the-day/

This quote is certainly a sentiment that I've held for much of my life. I have no idea where I first
developed it but here it is.

Here's some information about Charles Spurgeon:

'Charles Haddon Spurgeon (19 June 1834–31 January 1892) was an English Particular Baptist preacher. Spurgeon remains highly influential among Christians of various denominations, among whom he is known as the "Prince of Preachers".'

He's identified as being opposed to slavery and there's much more text and photos at this link:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Spurgeon

From The BBC: Your pictures of Scotland 23-30 July (2021)

And here it is, another delightful gallery of photos for our enjoyment!

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-57971665

Exhibition tells story of Spanish children used as vaccine fridges (storage) in 1803

From The Guardian:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jul/27/spanish-museum-celebrates-pioneer-who-took-smallpox-vaccine-to-colonies

When Francisco Javier de Balmis set off from Spain in 1803 to vaccinate the people in Spain’s colonies against smallpox he had no means of keeping the vaccine fresh, so he used children as his refrigerators (storage).

snip

Manuel Álvarez, who curated the exhibition, described it as “a homage to all the health workers who have struggled against Covid-19”.

Smallpox was killing millions in 18th century Europe but in 1796 the English physician Edward Jenner discovered that a bovine version of the disease worked as a vaccine.

Balmis, who was a military and court doctor, persuaded Spain’s King Carlos IV, whose daughter had died of smallpox, to fund the royal philanthropic vaccine expedition to Spain’s colonies.

more text and illustrations at link

Vaccines have a long history of effectiveness and anyone who thinks otherwise is a dangerous fool.

Good News Network: 100 years ago (today), two Canadians isolated the hormone insulin

A University of Toronto orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Frederick Banting, recruited the chemistry skills of an assistant, Charles Best, to help with isolating the insulin, which then produced normal blood glucose levels when injected.

Before the breakthrough, people with type 1 diabetes rarely lived more than a year or two. One of the 20th century’s greatest medical discoveries, it still remains the only effective treatment for type 1 diabetes.

By 1923, insulin had become widely available in mass production, and Banting was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine. Charles Best, being a graduate student, was not included, but Banting recognized him by sharing the award money.

Banting and his colleague John Macleod, who shared the Noble honor, were reluctant to patent their insulin process on grounds of medical ethics. But they did secure a patent, only to prevent any pharmaceutical company from gaining a monopoly, and they published their research so anyone could use it.

no more text but photo at link: https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/events060727/

This morning I'm enjoying having the TV running while I do computer/internet stuff. Right now

CW, which is channel 6 on my Comcast cable, is showing two episodes of The George Burns and
Gracie Allen Show from the early 1950s. I've always enjoyed their comedy and so did my Step-Dad.
This is one of the few things we both agreed on. The other thing was that we both loved my Mom.
Thinkin' of you, Dad.

The US Halts Old-Growth Timber Sales in World's Largest Remaining Temperate Rainforest

From The Good News Network

https://www.goodnewsnetwork.org/usda-halts-old-growth-timber-sales-in-tongass/

The USDA will also move to restore the two-decades-old ‘Roadless Rule’ protections at Tongass, which were stripped in 2020 by the Trump administration.

In this unique landscape, the Pacific Ocean moisture collides with the towering Coast Mountains on the Canadian border to create the lush greenery and thick old-growth forest that spans 500 miles at the Southern tip of the state. About the size of West Virginia, the land is filled with islands and salmon streams, where granite cliffs drop into deep fjords.

“We look forward to meaningful consultation with Tribal governments and Alaska Native corporations, and engaging with local communities, partners, and the State to prioritize management and investments in the region that reflect a holistic approach,” said US Secretary Tom Vilsack.

snip

“This approach will help us chart the path to long-term economic opportunities that are sustainable and reflect Southeast Alaska’s rich cultural heritage and magnificent natural resources,” he added.

It's good to see another Former Orange Lardo policy shut down, and especially this one. There's
a great photo and more text at the link. I admit that when I saw the photo I was immediately
inspired to seek out that tree and climb it!

From Reuters: Top Photos of the Day Fri Jul 23, 2021

I don't generally post photos from Al Jazeera or Reuters since they deal mainly in The News and I
figure if I've seen one set of photos of human-made or natural disasters I've seen them all.

But photo number 15 of 21 photos in this Reuters collection caught my eye and I spent a lot of time
looking at it. The photo shows a number of people moving through floodwaters in China. At least
three men visible in the photo are carrying children and are apparently closely attended by their wives and the mothers of the children. The men are not carrying baggage, TVs or computers, they are carrying children.

You, of course, are welcome to choose what most interests you.

https://www.reuters.com/news/picture/top-photos-of-the-day-idUSRTXEQ8UE

disclaimer: I have been in China multiple times and have great affection for the Chinese people.

Have you got The Full Moon Fever? The moon will be full at 8:36 pm, local time (Mountain

Daylight Saving Time) here in Albuquerque. Let's all have a howling good time.

Here are the various names for the full moon this month as found at the link below*:

July: Buck Moon

The Full Moon for the month of July is called Buck Moon to signify the new antlers that emerge on deer buck's foreheads around this time. This Full Moon is also known as Thunder Moon, Wort Moon, and Hay Moon from Old English/Anglo-Saxon.

* https://www.timeanddate.com/astronomy/moon/full-moon-names.html

From The Guardian: The week in wildlife - in pictures Fri 23 Jul 2021

It's a pleasure to view this picture gallery, but for me the photo of the blue flax flowers is well worth
the price of admission which includes the cost of my/our electronic equipment and the payments I/we
make for internet service. Enjoy!

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/gallery/2021/jul/23/the-week-in-wildlife-in-pictures

From The BBC: Your pictures of Scotland 16-23 July (2021)

All the best features of this weekly photo gallery are present today. We have the beauty of the
landscape, people and animals of Scotland. An added bonus is that the person who writes the
captions is in full "pun" mode. I'm pleased to see the swim vest on the dog in the "dog on boat" photo. In addition I learned a new word, "corrie"*. Enjoy!

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-57863337

* Evidently "corrie" is a Scottish Gaelic word that means "cauldron or hollow". "Corrie" is used to
describe a geographic feature in one photo that I would call a "mountain valley". Here are the
search results I found for the word "corrie":

https://duckduckgo.com/?t=ffab&q=scottish+word+corrie&ia=web

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