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Jilly_in_VA

Profile Information

Gender: Do not display
Current location: Virginia
Member since: Wed Jun 1, 2011, 07:34 PM
Number of posts: 6,716

About Me

Navy brat-->University fac brat. All over-->Wisconsin-->TN-->VA. RN (ret), married, grandmother of 11. Progressive since birth. My mouth may be foul but my heart is wide open.

Journal Archives

'Frightening trend': Deadly assaults on medical workers are rising

It's a medical nightmare: When the bullets fly not outside on the street, but in the doctor's office or the hospital itself.

This week's shooting that left four people dead at a Tulsa medical center is an all-too-familiar scenario for health care workers across the nation, who face assaults and even bullets on the job, according to studies and police reports of at least a dozen shootings across the U.S.

In another hospital attack on Friday, a man stabbed a doctor and two nurses at Encino Hospital Medical Center's emergency department in the San Fernando Valley of Los Angeles and barricaded himself inside. The man remained inside a room in the hospital for about four hours as SWAT team members tried to unsuccessfully to negotiate with him before he was finally arrested, police said.

"The risk of workplace violence is a serious occupational hazard for nurses and other health care workers," a recent study by National Nurses United found. "Countless acts of assault, battery, aggression, and threats of violence that routinely take place in health care settings demonstrate a frightening trend of increasing violence faced by health care workers throughout the country."

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2022/06/03/tulsa-shooting-medical-health-assaults/7490186001/
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The assault and battery, threats, etc. are nothing new to this old nurse. The shootings and stabbings most definitely are.

How RFK Could Have Become President

To see him at the podium claiming victory in the crucial California primary, jokingly thanking his dog Freckles, passionately hopeful that the divided country could come together, flashing a peace sign as he exhorts: ‘So it’s on to Chicago and let’s win there!” Knowing what is to come a moment later, it is hard not to assume that it was only Sirhan Sirhan’s bullets that kept Robert Kennedy out of the White House.

The cold political realities of June 1968 were very different. Despite his victory in the winner-take-all California primary—a victory that was well under the 50 percent mark the Kennedy campaign had hoped for—the primary season was ending, as virtually every TV analyst noted, with Vice President Hubert Humphrey, who had entered no primary battle, as the real winner. Big states without primaries, like New Jersey and Pennsylvania, were lined up solidly in his corner, as were the Southern states, as was the leader of the AFL-CIO. And once the New York primary ended two weeks after California, there was no place else to go to win delegates at the ballot box.

“We were losing altitude,” de facto campaign manager Fred Dutton reflected later. looking back at the political terrain Kennedy was facing. In fact, the day of the primary, Dutton was skeptical enough of our chances to suggest that RFK would take the vice-presidential slot if offered.

“Bobby’s a Roman,” Dutton said. “He’ll go where the power is.” And a delegate analysis showed that Humphrey would end the primary season with close to1,000 of the 1,312 delegates need for nomination; Bobby and Eugene McCarthy together had fewer than 700.

So the question that has lingered for half a century—Could RFK have won the White House?—needs an unsentimental look at the prospects, even from someone who worked as a Senate and campaign speechwriter. Some years ago, I devoted 150 pages of an alternate history book to suggest how that might have happened. That scenario included some imagined twists and turns that a strictly “reality-based” view requires reshaping. Here is an unvarnished outline of how he might have won.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/how-rfk-could-have-become-president?ref=home
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*cosmic sigh*

Dogs may be better at detecting Covid-19 than nasal PCR tests, study finds

Trained dogs may be able to detect Covid-19 more effectively than nasal swab PCR tests, according to new research.

A study published on Wednesday by the peer-reviewed Plos One journal found that canines were able to better detect the presence of Covid than PCR antigenic tests in both symptomatic and asymptomatic people.

In the study, trained dogs were able to detect Covid in 97% of symptomatic cases and nearly 100% of asymptomatic cases.

“The dog doesn’t lie,” Dominique Grandjean, a professor at the Alfort National Veterinary School in France and a study author, told Science News, noting that different errors can occur with PCR tests.

The study featured 335 participants from Covid screening centers in Paris. Of the participants, 109 were positive with Covid, including 31 who were asymptomatic.

The detection dogs, provided by French fire stations and the United Arab Emirates, received three to six weeks of training, depending on if a dog was previously trained for odor detection.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jun/02/dogs-covid-19-detection-better-pcr-tests-study
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Tell us if your own dog (or even cat) knew if you were sick with something before you did

'Theocratic' US abortion bans will violate religious liberty, faith leaders say

Misha Sanders was starting over. She had just left an abusive relationship, and she was in her first semester of seminary, all while caring for her child, a teenager with a pressing health problem.

That’s when she found out she was pregnant. Sanders took misoprostol and mifepristone, the two drugs known collectively as the abortion pill, to end the pregnancy.

The decision, she says, was deeply entwined with her religious beliefs, which include respecting full bodily autonomy and caring for other people – core beliefs of Unitarian Universalism, which she practices.

“The only decision that I could make, as a loving mother, was to focus on mothering this child that I brought into the world and terminating this new pregnancy,” Sanders said. “It was absolutely the right decision.”

But Sanders now lives in Georgia, which could pass restrictions on abortion after six weeks of pregnancy if Roe v Wade is overturned in the coming weeks.

Reproductive rights are under threat in the US as states implement harsher restrictions and the supreme court weighs a case that is widely expected to reverse the constitutional right to abortion.

But while religious arguments around the issue are commonly associated with the anti-abortion movement, abortion restrictions can violate the right to religious liberty, faith leaders and legal experts say. And some organizations are already gearing up for possible legal challenges to looming abortion bans.

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2022/jun/02/abortion-bans-violate-religious-liberty

Cruz Complains of Elites Using Bodyguards. He's One of Them.

Over the last year, a new campaign expense has emerged, and in keeping with the times it’s sufficiently dystopian: personal bodyguards.

When Sen. Ted Cruz (R-TX) went before the National Rifle Association’s annual gathering on Friday, he spoke about liberal “elites” who advocate for gun control while hiding behind “private security.”

But the irony of Cruz making that statement is that it’s actually Cruz himself who spends the most on private bodyguards among Republicans in Congress.

Since October 2020, the Cruz campaign has paid Houston-area executive protection firm Atlas Glinn nearly half a million dollars to protect himself and his family—$499,661, almost all of it in monthly lump sums averaging around $30,000, according to federal disclosures. (The Atlas Glinn website features a photo of a security detail guarding Cruz in a parade car.)

Cruz—a Harvard Law School grad who in the aftermath of last week’s elementary school massacre in Uvalde, Texas, attacked the Democratic politicians and the media for dominating the gun control narrative—also put more than $800 of his donors’ money toward “security equipment” last year from Houston-based boutique Caroline+Morgan Interiors. It’s not immediately clear from the company’s website exactly which of its wares would fit the bill as security equipment.

While Cruz is the biggest GOP spender, however, he also hauls in the most cash from pro-gun rights groups, according to data from the Center for Responsive Politics. But the threat of violence now appears to be outweighing those rewards, at least in financial terms. Cruz has spent so much donor money ensuring his own safety that he has fully exhausted the $442,343 he’s received over the years from the gun lobby, and then some.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/ted-cruz-complains-of-elites-using-bodyguards-hes-one-of-them?ref=home
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"Let he who is without sin..." However, there's a reason the Democrats cited are using bodyguards. It's called DEATH THREATS.

Schools forcing students to waive federal rights in some rape cases

A student at Villanova University who reported allegations of sexual misconduct was asked to sign a form that prevented her from sharing evidence of the case with almost anyone, even her parents. Violating the terms could have affected the outcome of the school’s investigation into what happened.

At the University of Alabama at Birmingham, a contract presented to students says that just talking about the process of reporting sexual misconduct could get a student expelled.

At York College of Pennsylvania, one student said he was threatened with academic discipline for telling his story on a podcast, violating a non-disclosure agreement that said he couldn’t discuss his allegations, even though he didn’t name the student he accused of rape.

These conditions, uncovered in an investigation of school policies for dealing with campus sexual violence, reveal an emerging trend: Schools are bullying students who report sexual assault into waiving certain rights before they can proceed with internal misconduct hearings.

It’s a practice that runs afoul of the law, according to several experts, and these three schools are not the only ones forcing students into problematic contracts. Public records requests at several schools turned up waivers that take away students’ right to discuss the investigative process, to review evidence in their own cases, even to share evidence with advocates or police. The punishment for violating can be anything from being placed at a disadvantage at their hearing to expulsion.

It’s not supposed to be this way. Federal law says schools must investigate complaints of sexual misconduct and violence unconditionally, and they must give both sides equal access to evidence.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2022/06/02/schools-students-federal-rights-rape-cases/9775181002/

Schools forcing students to waive federal rights in some rape cases

A student at Villanova University who reported allegations of sexual misconduct was asked to sign a form that prevented her from sharing evidence of the case with almost anyone, even her parents. Violating the terms could have affected the outcome of the school’s investigation into what happened.

At the University of Alabama at Birmingham, a contract presented to students says that just talking about the process of reporting sexual misconduct could get a student expelled.

At York College of Pennsylvania, one student said he was threatened with academic discipline for telling his story on a podcast, violating a non-disclosure agreement that said he couldn’t discuss his allegations, even though he didn’t name the student he accused of rape.

These conditions, uncovered in an investigation of school policies for dealing with campus sexual violence, reveal an emerging trend: Schools are bullying students who report sexual assault into waiving certain rights before they can proceed with internal misconduct hearings.

It’s a practice that runs afoul of the law, according to several experts, and these three schools are not the only ones forcing students into problematic contracts. Public records requests at several schools turned up waivers that take away students’ right to discuss the investigative process, to review evidence in their own cases, even to share evidence with advocates or police. The punishment for violating can be anything from being placed at a disadvantage at their hearing to expulsion.

It’s not supposed to be this way. Federal law says schools must investigate complaints of sexual misconduct and violence unconditionally, and they must give both sides equal access to evidence.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/education/2022/06/02/schools-students-federal-rights-rape-cases/9775181002/

The pollution from Russia's war will poison Ukraine for decades

n late May, a large plume of pink smoke erupted from a chemical plant and rose above apartment buildings in Ukraine’s eastern city of Severodonetsk. The smoke was toxic — it came from a tank of nitric acid that was struck by Russian military forces.

“Do not come out of shelters!” the region’s governor, Sergiy Gaiday, said on Telegram, following the attack. “Nitric acid is dangerous if inhaled, swallowed, and in contact with skin.”

Since Russia invaded Ukraine, exploding chemical plants have become a frightening reality for its citizens, but they’re just one example of the staggering toll that war is taking on the nation’s environment. Rockets are polluting the soil and groundwater; fires threaten to expel radioactive particles; and warships have reportedly killed dolphins in the Black Sea.

Though not as visible as the thousands of lost lives, the environmental costs of war are insidious, quietly harming people and wildlife for decades after fighting stops. Indeed, armed conflict is one of the leading predictors of animal declines and a major source of greenhouse gas emissions (the US military alone emits countries’ worth of carbon dioxide). War is also linked to human health problems, including cancer and birth defects.

Ukrainian environmental groups are keeping track of the damage, which some experts say amount to war crimes. So far, they’ve logged nearly 270 cases of potential harm, ranging from damage to power plants to impacts on marine ecosystems. Now, the question is: Will Russia be held accountable for them?

https://www.vox.com/down-to-earth/2022/6/2/23143250/ukraine-russia-war-pollution-emissions-environment

For 50 years, Alexander's been having terrible, horrible, no good, very bad days

He wakes up with gum in his hair, slips on his skateboard, gets snubbed by his best friend — and it just gets worse. Alexander is still easy to recognize 50 years after he entered the world of children's books.

On June 1, 1972, Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day was first published. Written by Judith Viorst with illustrations by Ray Cruz, the best seller has been made into a musical and a Hollywood movie. The book is so popular, Viorst's string of sad adjectives entered the vernacular; it's been used to describe lousy days, weeks and years far and wide, from political leaders to corporations.

Teachers have even used poor Alexander's misadventures to teach kids about cause and effect and ethics.

Viorst didn't need to look far for inspiration. The real Alexander is her third son, "and I guess in a way the most challenging of them because he did not want to be left out of anything," she reminisces, sitting on the now grown-up Alexander's front porch in Washington, D.C. "He was always chugging behind his brothers saying, 'Wait for me guys! Wait for me guys!'"

But that one day in this little boy's life is a cascade of bad karma.

https://www.npr.org/2022/06/01/1102134950/for-50-years-alexanders-been-having-terrible-horrible-no-good-very-bad-days
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My kids loved this book. So did my grandkids. So, as a matter of fact, did a lot of my adult friends.
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