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Thu Nov 5, 2020, 09:20 PM

This quote from MacBeth

Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage,
And then is heard no more. It is a tale
Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury
Signifying nothing.

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Arrow 19 replies Author Time Post
Reply This quote from MacBeth (Original post)
cilla4progress Nov 2020 OP
dhol82 Nov 2020 #1
cilla4progress Nov 2020 #2
dhol82 Nov 2020 #3
lunatica Nov 2020 #4
cilla4progress Nov 2020 #5
Stuart G Nov 2020 #6
cilla4progress Nov 2020 #7
Stuart G Nov 2020 #8
Ponietz Nov 2020 #9
cilla4progress Nov 2020 #10
Ponietz Nov 2020 #12
cilla4progress Nov 2020 #13
Ponietz Nov 2020 #14
cilla4progress Nov 2020 #15
Ponietz Nov 2020 #16
cilla4progress Nov 2020 #17
Ponietz Nov 2020 #18
Ponietz Nov 2020 #19
cilla4progress Nov 2020 #11

Response to cilla4progress (Original post)

Thu Nov 5, 2020, 09:21 PM

1. And signifying nothing

Sorry, saw the last line after I posted.
Don’t know why it didn’t show at first.

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Response to dhol82 (Reply #1)

Thu Nov 5, 2020, 09:24 PM

2. You caught it!

I left it out in error, initially.

Great parallels in these two stories of powerful men brought down.

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Response to cilla4progress (Reply #2)

Thu Nov 5, 2020, 09:26 PM

3. Indeed. I think the last line is what totally closes out the thought.

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Response to cilla4progress (Original post)

Thu Nov 5, 2020, 09:28 PM

4. The last sentence is my favorite Shakespeare quote!

It fit George W Bush and it fits Trump perfectly!

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Response to cilla4progress (Original post)

Thu Nov 5, 2020, 09:30 PM

5. Absolutely!

It resonated so much with me!

And to leave it off at first, shame on me.

But don't you love the parallels between Macbeth and drumpf's downfall? And both Scottish!

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Response to cilla4progress (Original post)

Thu Nov 5, 2020, 09:34 PM

6. Written at least 500 years ago...True to today...

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Response to Stuart G (Reply #6)

Thu Nov 5, 2020, 09:35 PM

7. Shakespeare,

huh.

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Response to cilla4progress (Original post)

Thu Nov 5, 2020, 09:48 PM

8. Willam did another play....Romeo and Juliet....

So in the 50s, someone did a movie based on that........"West Side Story"...

That one got all kinds of awards and was considered...."truly great"...but I did not know the origins...I remember leaving
the theater almost crying..Yes, it was as sad as Romeo and Juliet .....

.....On a lighter note Burton and Taylor did a comedy based on one of those plays..."Taming of the Shrew"
......that one is also great, but very funny...Yes, William Shakespeare wrote comedies too.


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Response to cilla4progress (Original post)

Thu Nov 5, 2020, 09:49 PM

9. King Lear was also full of sound and fury signifying nothing

I will have such revenges on you both
That all the world shall—I will do such things—
What they are yet I know not, but they shall be
The terrors of the earth. You think I’ll weep?
No, I’ll not weep.

Storm and tempest

I have full cause of weeping, but this heart
Shall break into a hundred thousand flaws,
Or ere I’ll weep.—O Fool, I shall go mad!

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Response to Ponietz (Reply #9)

Thu Nov 5, 2020, 09:56 PM

10. Shakespeare was tapped in

to the essence.

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Response to cilla4progress (Reply #10)

Fri Nov 6, 2020, 12:14 PM

12. This morning in Washington Post:

[link:https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/theater_dance/great-artistic-works-during-plagues/2020/11/05/6575cac2-1d29-11eb-90dd-abd0f7086a91_story.html|

More than 400 years ago, as epidemics raged in London, forcing theaters and other public places to shutter, William Shakespeare was busy crafting stories of kings going mad and thanes coveting power. He was, scholars believe, in the midst of an astonishingly potent creative period, one that produced some of the most extraordinary tragedies ever written — “King Lear” and “Macbeth” among them.

It was a remarkable achievement, one that got me thinking about our current moment and the possibility that during this pandemic, society’s artful dreamers might find their own inspiration and make similarly groundbreaking creations. “The great work begins,” playwright Tony Kushner wrote as the final words of “Angels in America,” his sprawling dramatic diptych of another terrible modern epidemic.

In perilous, isolating times, we hunger with a special zeal for great work by artists who can capture the experience for us. The novel coronavirus that has infected nearly 50 million people worldwide and killed 1.2 million — including more than 233,000 in the United States — has also created a vacuum in live entertainment of all kinds. That includes the performing arts, whose theaters and studios have been forced to shutter for months as organizations also furlough or dismiss scores of the 5.1 million arts workers in this country.

Stage actors union says no theaters are safe without these guidelines for reopening
All at once, the curtains closed on hundreds of plays, ballets, concerts, musicals — as well as the in-person classes in drama, music and dance that feed the future of these forms. Though some arts lovers have followed their favorite companies to the Web, where videos of old productions and super-skeletal versions of new projects are being tried out, one can’t avoid a certain hollow feeling — a cultural deprivation unprecedented in our lifetimes. Pause for just a moment from reflecting on the terrible losses inflicted on so many families by the coronavirus, and imagine another type of devastation: a life’s dream of seeing your new play onstage, or appearing in a recital marking the launch of your career, washed away in a tidal wave of worry about contagion in public places.
...(Continued)

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Response to Ponietz (Reply #12)

Fri Nov 6, 2020, 12:16 PM

13. I love you,

Ponietz.

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Response to cilla4progress (Reply #13)

Fri Nov 6, 2020, 12:20 PM

14. ...full of love and empathy, signifying everything.

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Response to Ponietz (Reply #14)

Fri Nov 6, 2020, 12:24 PM

15. Awww..!

I got to the last 18 minutes and my internet crapped out. Damned shitty internet where I live. Maybe Joe can fix that too, huh?

I found it interesting Shakespeare's view of feminine power in MacBeth. Strong theme.

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Response to cilla4progress (Reply #15)

Fri Nov 6, 2020, 01:13 PM

16. Lear, too. Only Cordelia is able to overcome Regan and Goneril

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Response to Ponietz (Reply #16)

Fri Nov 6, 2020, 01:26 PM

17. Will watch that next!

I was so happy that by having the subtitles on, and reading a synopsis beforehand, I was able to follow it!

What I mean about MacBeth is the power of prophesy by the witches...which seems to the driver or trigger for MacBeth going over the edge.

Same with Lady MacBeth. On one hand, the murderous power behind him - he is bewitched by her! - and then she finds her soul.

Hmm....

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Response to cilla4progress (Reply #17)


Response to cilla4progress (Reply #17)

Fri Nov 6, 2020, 01:56 PM

19. Olivier, John Hurt, Diana Rigg -- 1983

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Response to cilla4progress (Original post)

Thu Nov 5, 2020, 10:38 PM

11. I found a 2015 version with

Michael Fassbinder and Marianne Cotillard to watch tonight!

This has been my coping strategy, though this is the 1st heavy film I've chosen.

Good luck, all!!

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