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Tue Nov 30, 2021, 03:58 PM

Death of UNLV student ruled a homicide, investigation launched into boxing match

The death of a Las Vegas college student who died after participating in a fraternity boxing match has been ruled a homicide, the coroner's office said.

Nathan Valencia, 20, a student at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, died on Nov. 23, four days after he took part in Kappa Sigma's "Fight Night" event.

The Clark County Coroner said Valencia's cause of death was blunt force trauma to the head and was classified as a homicide. The Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Department did not immediately return a request for comment on Tuesday.

The boxing match was held on Nov. 19 and raised money for Center Ring Boxing, a youth boxing club, Kappa Sigma said in an Instagram post. The fraternity said Valencia's match was the "main event."

The boxing match was held off-campus, said university president Keith E. Whitfield.

https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/death-unlv-student-ruled-homicide-investigation-launched-boxing-match-rcna7114
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The article says the fight was "school sanctioned". Really, UNLV?

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Reply Death of UNLV student ruled a homicide, investigation launched into boxing match (Original post)
Jilly_in_VA Nov 2021 OP
mahatmakanejeeves Nov 2021 #1
Jilly_in_VA Nov 2021 #2
Torchlight Nov 2021 #3
LisaL Nov 2021 #4
Torchlight Nov 2021 #5
redstatebluegirl Nov 2021 #6
redstatebluegirl Nov 2021 #7
PTWB Nov 2021 #8

Response to Jilly_in_VA (Original post)

Tue Nov 30, 2021, 04:16 PM

1. Back in the 1930s, the University of Virginia was a boxing powerhouse.

Mortimer Caplin, who was eventually the Commissioner of Internal Revenue, was a boxer while an undergraduate there.

Mortimer Caplin



Commissioner of Internal Revenue

In office: February 7, 1961 – July 10, 1964

Born: Mortimer Maxwell Caplin; July 11, 1916; New York City, New York, U.S.
Died: July 15, 2019 (aged 103); Chevy Chase, Maryland, U.S.
Political party: Democratic
Education: University of Virginia (BS, LLB)
New York University: (LLM, SJD)

Mortimer Maxwell Caplin (July 11, 1916 – July 15, 2019) was an American lawyer and educator, and the founding member of Caplin & Drysdale, Chartered.

{snip}

Early life

{snip}

First in his class at the University of Virginia School of Law, and Editor-in-Chief of Virginia Law Review, Caplin served as a law clerk to U.S. Circuit Judge Armistead M. Dobie. He then practiced law in New York City from 1941 to 1950, with time out for military service in the United States Navy. During the invasion of Normandy, he served as U.S. Navy beachmaster, cited as member of initial landing force on Omaha Beach and the recipient of the French Legion of Honor.

In 1950, Caplin returned to UVA as professor of law, specializing in tax and corporate law and publishing extensively in these fields. He spent 33 years on the faculty of the U-Va. law school and jokingly credited his Internal Revenue Service appointment in 1961 to his “good judgment — the good judgment to have both Bobby and Teddy Kennedy as students at the University of Virginia and to pass them both. He also served as adjunct professor of law at The George Washington University Law School from 1965 to 1966 and at the University of Miami School of Law from 1967 to 1970. Additionally, Caplin engaged in practice as counsel to a Virginia law firm. He turned 100 in July 2016.

Government experience

Following President John F. Kennedy's election, Caplin served on the President's Task Force on Taxation and in January 1961 was appointed U.S. Commissioner of Internal Revenue.

{snip}

Awards and honors

Caplin's contributions were recognized by numerous organizations over many years. The University of Virginia presented him the Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan Jr. Award from its National Advocacy Program as well as the Thomas Jefferson Medal in Law, the university's highest honor. Caplin also received an honorary Doctor of Laws from Washington College in Chestertown, Maryland. The American Bar Foundation honored him at the National World War II Museum in New Orleans founded by historian and author, Stephen Ambrose. He was also named "Chevalier" of the Légion d'honneur or Legion of Honor by the President of the French Republic for his contributions to the United States' decisive role in the liberation of France during World War II. The Maryland General Assembly issued an official citation in recognition of his appointment as "Chevalier" of the Legion of Honor.

Caplin was the star middleweight of a national championship boxing team as a University of Virginia undergraduate in the mid-1930s.

{snip}

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Response to mahatmakanejeeves (Reply #1)

Tue Nov 30, 2021, 05:17 PM

2. Yeah, well

back in the 1950s so was the University of Wisconsin. I went to school with the boxing coach's sons. (I went to school with almost all the UW athletic coaches' kids because they all lived in our neighborhood at the time, those being the days before multi-million dollar paydays for them.) That all changed with the death of one of the team members, Charlie Mohr, following a match in the NCAA tournament in which he was knocked out. I remember that quite well. It was 1960.The faculty senate in Madison, of which my father was a member, voted to abolish the sport and the NCAA discontinued its tournament–citing the diminished number of schools participating–not long after.

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Response to Jilly_in_VA (Original post)

Tue Nov 30, 2021, 05:26 PM

3. A school sanctioned-event with no medical personnel present and a drunk referee with no training?

Granted, I don't watch boxing but my guess is there are very stringent regulations in place, even at amateur matches, to prevent this very thing from happening.

Some heads will roll, some cash will be payed out, and it will most likely happen again after some other horrible thing happens to push this one out of the news-cycle.

Damn.

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Response to Torchlight (Reply #3)

Tue Nov 30, 2021, 05:28 PM

4. Add to this, kid had no boxing experience per his family.

NT

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Response to LisaL (Reply #4)

Tue Nov 30, 2021, 05:35 PM

5. My guess (only a guess) is he did it to impress his frat brothers.

I pledged my freshman year and made some pretty foolish mistakes trying to impress the older guys.

Serendipity played a much more critical role in my youth than I ever give it credit for.



(I dropped out of the frat sophomore year-- no fault of theirs or mine, just wasn't me)

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Response to Jilly_in_VA (Original post)

Tue Nov 30, 2021, 05:39 PM

6. The Greek system has run it's course.

Time to get rid of them.

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Response to Jilly_in_VA (Original post)


Response to Jilly_in_VA (Original post)

Tue Nov 30, 2021, 05:55 PM

8. The manner of death (homicide) has no bearing on the legality of said death.

 

It's a pet peeve of mine when news organizations blast headlines with "DEATH RULED HOMICIDE!" in cases where the death was obviously a homicide. They're counting on uneducated readers clicking those stories because they equate homicide with murder.

"WATER IS WET!" - News at 11.

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