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Sun Dec 21, 2014, 03:10 PM

Cuba already went through an energy famine - How they survived "peak oil" (53 mins)

Without, oil, Cuba was already put through what we will inevitably go through after peak oil…

Here's an excellent documentary of how we can learn FAR more from Cuba's sustainable energy, through their political will, rather than exhausting oil. Cuba did not have access to the World Bank, so this is a REAL experiment with an oil crisis.

We can LEARN from this:



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Reply Cuba already went through an energy famine - How they survived "peak oil" (53 mins) (Original post)
MrMickeysMom Dec 2014 OP
Elmergantry Dec 2014 #1
MrMickeysMom Dec 2014 #2
Peace Patriot Dec 2014 #3
Peace Patriot Dec 2014 #4
freedom fighter jh Dec 2014 #5
MrMickeysMom Dec 2014 #8
freedom fighter jh Dec 2014 #11
MrMickeysMom Dec 2014 #12
freedom fighter jh Dec 2014 #13
MrMickeysMom Dec 2014 #14
freedom fighter jh Dec 2014 #15
Judi Lynn Dec 2014 #6
MrMickeysMom Dec 2014 #7
Mika Dec 2014 #9
MrMickeysMom Dec 2014 #10

Response to MrMickeysMom (Original post)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 09:01 PM

1. Cant wait!

 

[link:|

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Response to Elmergantry (Reply #1)

Sun Dec 21, 2014, 09:32 PM

2. Perfect!

Isn't this the vehicle of choice for a Sinclair Lewis novel traveling evangelist?

Enjoy your stay!

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Response to Elmergantry (Reply #1)

Mon Dec 22, 2014, 03:34 AM

3. Ha, ha, ha, ha, ha, ha!

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Response to MrMickeysMom (Original post)

Mon Dec 22, 2014, 05:16 AM

4. Awesome documentary! And a very, VERY important one!

Thanks for posting it! I've bookmarked it and will be sending it around to friends!

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Response to MrMickeysMom (Original post)

Mon Dec 22, 2014, 08:47 AM

5. Wow

I learned a great deal from watching this. I had no real idea of what Cuba went through in the nineties. I just remember David Brinkley, on his Sunday morning talk show, gloating about what terrible shape Cuba must be in -- something about a downward spiral -- given that they were importing bicycles.

From this video it looks like Cuba has taken on the challenges that will soon be with all of us, and after some suffering they have thrived.

Thank you for posting.

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Response to freedom fighter jh (Reply #5)

Mon Dec 22, 2014, 09:24 PM

8. I think one very important distinction ...

They have been a sort of test case for truly independent solutions to food deserts, since the World Bank couldn't muscle in, as they once might have. They learned by trial and error local farming, then discovered the nature of the slow food movement, took it beyond the limited vegetable based diet they had. I didn't see too many heavy Cubans. Maybe bad teeth, but otherwise well developed and well nourished adults.

Sure, it isn't the United States, but the pockets of food deserts we have in the US can take a few lessons here.

One of the other things I've always understood about literacy there might have assisted with learning. They are more literate than we are in the US.

You're welcomed.

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Response to MrMickeysMom (Reply #8)

Tue Dec 23, 2014, 07:03 PM

11. Oh, I didn't think about the World Bank.

Good point.

I've heard about the International Monetary Fund (which, I think, is related to the World Bank) "helping" out struggling countries by giving them loans that the country can repay only by exploiting its natural resources, sometimes creating a lot of pollution. It doesn't usually end well.

I suppose Cuba is outside of their reach.

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Response to freedom fighter jh (Reply #11)

Tue Dec 23, 2014, 11:03 PM

12. "I suppose Cuba is outside of their reach…"

… I would say they are, for now…" I don't think they'll make the same mistake twice as in the times of Batista.

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Response to MrMickeysMom (Reply #12)

Tue Dec 23, 2014, 11:44 PM

13. What mistake was that?

I don't know much about the Batista days.

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Response to freedom fighter jh (Reply #13)

Wed Dec 24, 2014, 07:24 AM

14. I'll borrow from Wikipedia's description

Fulgencio Batista y Zaldívar (January 16, 1901 – August 6, 1973) was the elected President of Cuba from 1940 to 1944, and dictator from 1952 to 1959, before being overthrown as a result of the Cuban Revolution.

Batista initially rose to power as part of the 1933 "Revolt of the Sergeants" that overthrew the authoritarian rule of Gerardo Machado. Batista then appointed himself chief of the armed forces, with the rank of colonel, and effectively controlled the five-member Presidency. He maintained this control through a string of puppet presidents until 1940, when he was himself elected President of Cuba on a populist platform. He then instated the 1940 Constitution of Cuba, considered progressive for its time, and served until 1944. After finishing his term he lived in the United States, returning to Cuba to run for president in 1952. Facing certain electoral defeat, he led a military coup that preempted the election.

Batista suspended the 1940 Constitution and revoked most political liberties, including the right to strike. He then aligned with the wealthiest landowners who owned the largest sugar plantations, and presided over a stagnating economy that widened the gap between rich and poor Cubans. Batista's increasingly corrupt and repressive government then began to systematically profit from the exploitation of Cuba's commercial interests, by negotiating lucrative relationships with the American mafia, who controlled the drug, gambling, and prostitution businesses in Havana, and with large multinational American corporations that had invested considerable amounts of money in Cuba.

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Response to MrMickeysMom (Reply #14)

Wed Dec 24, 2014, 08:45 AM

15. Tx 4 that info. nt

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Response to MrMickeysMom (Original post)

Mon Dec 22, 2014, 11:29 AM

6. Thank you, MrMickeysMom. n/t

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Response to Judi Lynn (Reply #6)

Mon Dec 22, 2014, 09:16 PM

7. You are welcomed! … eom

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Response to MrMickeysMom (Original post)

Tue Dec 23, 2014, 12:54 PM

9. I was travelling back and forth frequently during that period.

 

Tough times. Cubans handled it with aplomb. Unity.

Thanks for posting this again.



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Response to Mika (Reply #9)

Tue Dec 23, 2014, 02:13 PM

10. You're welcomed… Unity is more meaningful...

… when you have absolutely no other back up plan.

I don't think my particular view gathers this as an action plan in the U.S. quite yet.

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