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Thu Oct 24, 2019, 12:00 AM

How to Ignore A Fennec Fox (By Troy the Siberian Husky)

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Response to Demovictory9 (Original post)

Thu Oct 24, 2019, 12:03 AM

1. I sure couldn't ignore a fennec fox.

Squee!

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Response to The Velveteen Ocelot (Reply #1)

Thu Oct 24, 2019, 12:07 AM

2. google them in youtube. They are as annoying as hell. running and screaming and peeing

&t=59s

&t=34s

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Response to Demovictory9 (Reply #2)

Thu Oct 24, 2019, 12:16 AM

4. yeah, that's why foxes make bad pets. you cant housebreak them.

 

i was wondering about that, because years ago the soviets ran a genetic experiment to breed fur fox by temperament. they mated the aggressive w the aggressive and the tame w the tame. in something like 10 generations, they had a tame fox. and some bad ass killer foxes.
the really interesting thing is that in the same generation, the coloring broke down. mutations galore.

i follow a couple of exotic vets on fb, and one posted a pic of someone's artic fox. so i asked about this. i was told that those russian foxes are out there, and people go to great lengths to get them, but because they are territory markers they cant be housebroken.

bummer. i wonder how many generations it would take to do that.

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Response to mopinko (Reply #4)

Thu Oct 24, 2019, 12:21 AM

5. youtubers with exotic pets (foxes, raccoons, possums, etc) lots of warnings - they aren't for everyo

everyone. warn people not to get them as pets

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Response to Demovictory9 (Reply #5)

Thu Oct 24, 2019, 12:27 AM

6. yeah, even parrots, people get them for the wrong reasons.

 

my vet is an old friend. he treats everything. but i hear the stories.

i'm a critter person. i get it. but i dont do stupid. lorikeets and house chickens is as far as i go.

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Response to mopinko (Reply #4)

Thu Oct 24, 2019, 09:57 AM

7. This was a classic, valuable experiment about canine domestication...

I remember that experiment being about breeding for sociability towards humans. I don't remember selecting for the aggression part.

The interesting thing is over the generations... They noticed that with sociability toward humans came physical changes in coloration, tail curliness, etc. The temperament and physical changes were due to mutations of course, but selecting for sociability was also unintentionally selecting for changes in physical characteristics... meaning the genes for sociability were closely linked to genes for physical characteristics.

Scientists theorized the current massive physical variations among domestic dog breeds came about because of human selective pressure for social dogs over 40,000 years since the grey wolf.

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Response to targetpractice (Reply #7)

Thu Oct 24, 2019, 10:03 AM

8. hmmm. your last statement seems wrong. dogs werent bred for personality.

 

they were bred for jobs.
iirc, the roman war dogs are considered the first to be bred for a job, and it wasnt a sociable one. their physical attributes are related to their tasks and their environments.

but yeah, that bit about the physical traits and temperament breaking in the same generation was fascinating. they were so cute.

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Response to mopinko (Reply #8)

Thu Oct 24, 2019, 10:22 AM

9. Sociability may be the wrong word...

...but, definitely the ability to get along with humans, trainability, intelligence.

The line between companionship and work is blurry.

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Response to Demovictory9 (Reply #2)

Thu Oct 24, 2019, 04:45 PM

10. Too hyper for my house, but cute anyhow.

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Response to Demovictory9 (Original post)

Thu Oct 24, 2019, 12:12 AM

3. Never have seen a Fennec before and never this combo of cuteness as the funny fox and the

handsome, nonchalant Siberian Husky. Well, they both were pretty casual. No fear in the fox.

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