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Tue Jun 28, 2016, 05:00 PM

Homeschool SAT Scores for 2014 Higher Than National Average

The SAT 2014 test scores of college-bound homeschool students were higher than the national average of all college-bound seniors that same year. Some 13,549 homeschool seniors had the following mean scores: 567 in critical reading, 521 in mathematics, and 535 in writing (College Board, 2014a). The mean SAT scores for all college-bound seniors in 2014 were 497 in critical reading, 513 in mathematics, and 487 in writing (College Board, 2014b). The homeschool studentsí SAT scores were 0.61 standard deviation higher in reading, 0.26 standard deviation higher in mathematics, and 0.42 standard deviation higher in writing than those of all college-bound seniors taking the SAT, and these are notably large differences.

There were some demographic differences between homeschool students and all students taken together. First, the family incomes of the homeschool students were similar to those of all students. Regarding ethnicity, for example, 72 percent of the homeschool students were White, 5 percent were Asian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander, and 4 percent were Black or African American, while of all college-bound seniors, the corresponding percentages were 49, 12, and 13. The average highest level of parental education was notably higher for the homeschool students than for all students.

This point-in-time description of SAT scores simply shows that the test scores of homeschool students are higher than the national average for all students. No careful analysis has been done of these scores to determine whether certain background variables might statistically explain the differences in scores. These relatively high SAT scores of home-educated students are consistent with their high SAT scores in preceding research and with research findings on the overall success of college students who were home educated (Gloeckner & Jones, 2013; Murphy, 2012; Ray & Eagleson, 2008).


http://www.nheri.org/research/nheri-news/homeschool-sat-scores-for-2014-higher-than-national-average.html


In prior studies, after accounting for demographic differences, homeschoolers tended to score slightly lower on math and moderately higher on other subjects. This appears to be consistent with that.

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Reply Homeschool SAT Scores for 2014 Higher Than National Average (Original post)
FBaggins Jun 2016 OP
d_r Jun 2016 #1
FBaggins Jun 2016 #2
d_r Jun 2016 #3
mopinko Jun 2016 #4

Response to FBaggins (Original post)

Tue Jun 28, 2016, 05:14 PM

1. This sentence right here

No careful analysis has been done of these scores to determine whether certain background variables might statistically explain the differences in scores.


who peer reviews this stuff?

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Response to d_r (Reply #1)

Tue Jun 28, 2016, 06:26 PM

2. There isn't anything to review

He's just reporting the scores at this point. It's appropriate for him to point out work that remains to be done - and I gave the comparison to prior results.

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Response to FBaggins (Reply #2)

Tue Jun 28, 2016, 08:46 PM

3. Ive seen too much

Data left in the desk drawer not to be skeptical of that sentence, as would any reviewer worth their salt. Those analysis would take five minutes.

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Response to FBaggins (Original post)

Wed Jun 29, 2016, 10:53 AM

4. take that, haters.

left wing homeschoolers are doing amazing things.
parents w differently abled kids put it all on the line for them. and it pays.

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