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Judi Lynn

(161,325 posts)
Tue May 28, 2024, 11:42 PM May 28

Orcas are still smashing up boats - and we've finally worked out why

By Bronwyn Thompson
May 27, 2024



This orca gave a team competing in The Ocean Race a scare The Ocean Race
VIEW 2 IMAGES

For four years now, orcas have been ramming and sinking luxury yachts in European waters, and scientists have struggled to work out just why these smart, social animals had learnt this destructive new trick. But, sadly, it's not their anticapitalist 'eat the rich' agenda, nor is it to do with territory and aggression. The truth is, well, it's child's play.

Following years of research, a team of biologists, government officials and marine industry representatives have released their findings on just why one particular Orcinus orca group has developed this destructive streak. And it turns out, orcas – especially the kids and teens – just want to have fun. The report reveals that a combination of free time, curiosity and natural playfulness has led to young orcas adopting this 'trend' of boat-bumping, which is not at all surprising for a species that has been known to adopt odd, isolated behaviors from time to time.

Following years of research, a team of biologists, government officials and marine industry representatives have released their findings on just why one particular Orcinus orca group has developed this destructive streak. And it turns out, orcas – especially the kids and teens – just want to have fun. The report reveals that a combination of free time, curiosity and natural playfulness has led to young orcas adopting this 'trend' of boat-bumping, which is not at all surprising for a species that has been known to adopt odd, isolated behaviors from time to time.

"In addition, climate change could be playing a role, leading to these tuna being in the Gulf of Cádiz continuously rather than seasonally," the scientists noted. "This year-round abundance means that there appears to no longer be a need for the whales to pursue every fish encountered."


More:
https://newatlas.com/biology/orcas-killer-whales-boats/

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Orcas are still smashing up boats - and we've finally worked out why (Original Post) Judi Lynn May 28 OP
Do they watch TikTok, by chance? nt intrepidity May 28 #1
I'm worried about what'll happen if they do. Vogon_Glory May 29 #2

Vogon_Glory

(9,263 posts)
2. I'm worried about what'll happen if they do.
Wed May 29, 2024, 07:22 PM
May 29

I read elsewhere that humans are finally—FINALLY—decoding at least one cetacean language. After humans decode Orca-speak, I suspect it’ll be only a matter of time before they’ll get access to the internet, Tik-Toc, and be able to compare notes with their brethren in other sea and oceans.

Then the boat-bumping fad will really start spreading.

EDIT:

Take care, yachtsmen! Da boys are back in town and in the bay again!

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