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marmar

(77,434 posts)
Sat May 14, 2016, 11:26 AM May 2016

Frequent service, not escalator access, is what attracts transit users


from the Transport Politic blog:



Frequent service, not escalator access, is what attracts transit users


[font size="1"]Boston’s Green Line extension, bloated after years of planning, gets slimmed down. A lesson for other cities.[/font]


Given how reliant the people of New York City are on their Subway, an outsider just looking at ridership data might conclude that the system must be paved with gold, or at least its stations must be decent to look at. After all, it wouldn’t be unreasonable to assume that the comfort of a transit system plays an essential role in encouraging people to abandon their cars and get on the train or bus. That’s why, some would argue, it’s so important to put amenities like USB charging and wifi into transit vehicles.

Yet anyone who has ever ridden the Subway knows first hand that its success has nothing to do with aesthetics or access to luxury amenities. Stations are hardly in good shape, trains are packed, and cell service is spotty at best. People ride the Subway in spite of these things; they ride it because it’s fast, it’s frequent, and it’s (relatively) reliable.

Too often, this simple fact is ignored by public agencies actually making decisions about how to invest. New York’s own $4 billion World Trade Center Transportation Hub—perhaps the world’s single-most expensive station—is evidence of that; rather than improve service frequency or speed, officials chose to direct public funds to a white monument that does nothing to actually ease the lives of daily commuters.

Initial plans for the MBTA’s Green Line extension, which would extend light rail service from Cambridge into Somerville and Medford—all three are close-in suburbs of Boston—featured none of the extravagances of downtown Manhattan’s new transit terminal. Yet it too was designed with unnecessary features that, while nice, did little to actually solve the travel needs of its future users. Its projected construction costs exploded such that officials announced last year the proposal could be cancelled. Now, after several months of review, the MBTA and the state government have voted to proceed with design changes meant to significantly bring down costs—but without compromising the quality of transit service to be offered to riders. ............(more)

http://www.thetransportpolitic.com/2016/05/10/frequent-service-not-escalator-access-is-what-attracts-transit-users/




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Frequent service, not escalator access, is what attracts transit users (Original Post) marmar May 2016 OP
Boston and the Commonwealth have a problem with corruption, let's be honest. MADem May 2016 #1
Can someone please pass this on to Sound Transit? LisaM May 2016 #2

MADem

(135,425 posts)
1. Boston and the Commonwealth have a problem with corruption, let's be honest.
Sat May 14, 2016, 11:37 AM
May 2016

There's graft and patronage abounding--and transportation authorities have had their share of "no work" morons on the payroll who get a hefty pension at the end of their career.

I wish they'd approach these projects with something resembling fiscal responsibility, but it always seems that someone has their hand out, and the costs go up, up and away.

I'll bet this "economy" version ends up costing as much as the fancy one. And we'll find out when it's halfway finished and we're forced to eat the cost overruns.

LisaM

(28,006 posts)
2. Can someone please pass this on to Sound Transit?
Sat May 14, 2016, 11:47 AM
May 2016

I just had 6 of the 8 buses I ride eliminated so they can build fancy stations for a $2 billion project that will only have 5 stops.

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