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niyad

niyad's Journal
niyad's Journal
December 31, 2023

Natural Grocers just sent me an email, saying they will be closed New Year's Day

so that their staff can enjoy the holiday. I think that is very nice of them. All the other stores around here will be open.

December 30, 2023

Why am I suddenly, randomly, getting a screen with a green circle and a

legend that reads, "verifying your browser"? It is not like I am just logging in, it happens when I am going from one post or forum to another. And it has just been happening the last two or three days.

December 29, 2023

December 29, 1890. Wounded Knee Massacre. Largest mass murder in US. 300

Lakota women, children, and men murdered or wounded. The destruction of the Indigenous peoples was nearly complete.

December 28, 2023

"If you want me to respect your beliefs, have some beliefs worth respecting."

A quote I found in one of my new calendars. Just had to share.

December 27, 2023

"Estella Scrooge: A Christmas Carol With A Twist", a Streaming

Musical.

I just got done watching this very interesting, and very well-done, musical version of Dickens' classic on youtube. The setting and music and references are very modern, very up-to-date. The three spirit visits special effects were amazing. Most interesting was the filming. It was done in NY in 2020 at the height of the covid shutdown. Each actor was filmed separately in front of the green screens, and blended together flawlessly.

I hope that some of you will enjoy it as much as I did.

December 23, 2023

Empowering Change and Building Women's Power: On the Ground at the Reykjavk Global Forum

(An absolutely fascinating, lengthy, important read)


Empowering Change and Building Women’s Power: On the Ground at the Reykjavík Global Forum
12/22/2023 by Cynthia Richie Terrell
The Reykjavík Global Forum convenes women leaders to share solutions on how to further advance society towards gender equity and grow the number of women in leadership positions.


The sixth annual Reykjavík Global Forum, hosted by the government and Parliament of Iceland last month, convened more than 500 people from 80 countries, creating a diverse and dynamic platform to address critical global issues and build women’s power.

I had the honor of representing RepresentWomen (https://www.representwomen.org/) and our mission at the forum and was thrilled to be part of the delegation led by Susannah Wellford, of Running Start alums, who gave a terrific presentation and enriched and diversified the program in many ways.


Running Starts alums presenting at the Reykjavik Global Forum: Caroline Hoover, Sherra Bennet, Alexis Williams and Lyssa Schei Davids.

The forum began with an informative tour of Parliament, where women hold 48 percent of seats, followed by a reception at the home of the president of Iceland, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson and his accomplished wife, author Eliza Reid. Highlights of the gathering included Icelandic pancakes, opening remarks from co-founders of the forum Hanna Birna Kristjansdottir and Silvana Koch-Mehrin, and a welcome from co-chairs Ashley Judd and Adela Raz.


From left: Eliza Reid, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson, Ashley Judd and friends.
‘Power, Together for Leadership’

. . . .



This year the forum incorporated data from the Nordic countries for the first time—Iceland’s score of 92 makes it an interesting case study of what institutional and cultural factors have led to such low levels of attitudinal barriers for women in Iceland, and if they can be replicated and adapted for use elsewhere. It was sobering to learn that overall, most G7 countries have seen stagnant or declining scores in the perception of women’s leadership since 2018.


Focus on Four Action Items

While the index offered a compelling argument for why work is still needed to advance women’s leadership, a session led by Christy Tanner, senior advisor to the Reykjavik Global Forum, provided a terrific roadmap for how to advance women’s leadership. Tanner reported on her work with the Reykjavik Global Action Advisory Board, which led to the development of a new strategy that is focused on the Reykjavík Action Items that serve as powerful tools to transform data into action. These policy initiatives include:

equal pay
equal representation
equal parental leave
ending gender-based violence

All are critically important for building women’s political power and leadership.



“We encourage international women leaders to focus on four key actions to promote equality in the world: equal pay, a more equal share of the sexes in decision-making, equal parental leave and actions to end gender-based violence,” said Hanna Birna Kristjánsdóttir.

. . . . .



. . . .



Michelle Milford Morse with an attendee in Reykjavik.

. . . . . .


Former women presidents with Laura Liswood and Rick Zednik.
. . . .


RepresentWomen advisor Laura Liswood with Running Start CEO and RepresentWomen board member Susannah Wellford.
. . . .

Here is a translation I found online:

“In sight there is now freedom

And it could have been sooner

Now women mass together

and carry signs of freedom

the hour is upon us

let’s all stand hand in hand

and firmly stand our ground

even though many want to go backwards

and others stand in place

we’ll never accept that.”



Forum co-host Ashley Judd with Vigdís Finnbogadóttir, who became the first democratically elected female head of state when elected president of Iceland in 1980.


Women’s Power Strengthens Democracy

Despite examples of setbacks reported in the Reykjavík Index and other research studies, the forum was filled with energy and commitment to advancing gender equality, through the Reykjavík Action Items and many conversations about strategies to build women’s power. This collective dedication underscores the reality that we all understand the urgency of addressing gender inequality, and shows how powerful a global community can be when united by a common cause. To take action and keep pushing the needle on gender balance in the United States, it’s important to examine what is working in countries like Iceland to address attitudinal and structural barriers in both the private and public sectors, and consider how those strategies can be adapted and replicated in countries like the United States. The momentum sparked at this event is a testament to the value of doing this work in community, and building a movement dedicated to empowering women leaders. Through collective efforts, we can turn the Reykjavík Action Items into a global reality and work towards representative, equitable, empowered and resilient democracies around the globe.


Sweet treats, candle light to brighten the short days, and soft guitar melodies were all clear signals that the Reykjavik Global Forum is dedicated to building the spaces for women to come together to bridge divides, build relationships, and blaze a path to women’s equality.


https://msmagazine.com/2023/12/22/women-politics-leadership-reykjavik-global-forum-gender-equality-equity/

December 23, 2023

Empowering Change and Building Women's Power: On the Ground at the Reykjavk Global Forum

(An absolutely fascinating, lengthy, important read)


Empowering Change and Building Women’s Power: On the Ground at the Reykjavík Global Forum
12/22/2023 by Cynthia Richie Terrell
The Reykjavík Global Forum convenes women leaders to share solutions on how to further advance society towards gender equity and grow the number of women in leadership positions.


The sixth annual Reykjavík Global Forum, hosted by the government and Parliament of Iceland last month, convened more than 500 people from 80 countries, creating a diverse and dynamic platform to address critical global issues and build women’s power.

I had the honor of representing RepresentWomen (https://www.representwomen.org/) and our mission at the forum and was thrilled to be part of the delegation led by Susannah Wellford, of Running Start alums, who gave a terrific presentation and enriched and diversified the program in many ways.


Running Starts alums presenting at the Reykjavik Global Forum: Caroline Hoover, Sherra Bennet, Alexis Williams and Lyssa Schei Davids.

The forum began with an informative tour of Parliament, where women hold 48 percent of seats, followed by a reception at the home of the president of Iceland, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson and his accomplished wife, author Eliza Reid. Highlights of the gathering included Icelandic pancakes, opening remarks from co-founders of the forum Hanna Birna Kristjansdottir and Silvana Koch-Mehrin, and a welcome from co-chairs Ashley Judd and Adela Raz.


From left: Eliza Reid, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson, Ashley Judd and friends.
‘Power, Together for Leadership’

. . . .



This year the forum incorporated data from the Nordic countries for the first time—Iceland’s score of 92 makes it an interesting case study of what institutional and cultural factors have led to such low levels of attitudinal barriers for women in Iceland, and if they can be replicated and adapted for use elsewhere. It was sobering to learn that overall, most G7 countries have seen stagnant or declining scores in the perception of women’s leadership since 2018.


Focus on Four Action Items

While the index offered a compelling argument for why work is still needed to advance women’s leadership, a session led by Christy Tanner, senior advisor to the Reykjavik Global Forum, provided a terrific roadmap for how to advance women’s leadership. Tanner reported on her work with the Reykjavik Global Action Advisory Board, which led to the development of a new strategy that is focused on the Reykjavík Action Items that serve as powerful tools to transform data into action. These policy initiatives include:

equal pay
equal representation
equal parental leave
ending gender-based violence

All are critically important for building women’s political power and leadership.



“We encourage international women leaders to focus on four key actions to promote equality in the world: equal pay, a more equal share of the sexes in decision-making, equal parental leave and actions to end gender-based violence,” said Hanna Birna Kristjánsdóttir.

. . . . .



. . . .



Michelle Milford Morse with an attendee in Reykjavik.

. . . . . .


Former women presidents with Laura Liswood and Rick Zednik.
. . . .


RepresentWomen advisor Laura Liswood with Running Start CEO and RepresentWomen board member Susannah Wellford.
. . . .

Here is a translation I found online:

“In sight there is now freedom

And it could have been sooner

Now women mass together

and carry signs of freedom

the hour is upon us

let’s all stand hand in hand

and firmly stand our ground

even though many want to go backwards

and others stand in place

we’ll never accept that.”



Forum co-host Ashley Judd with Vigdís Finnbogadóttir, who became the first democratically elected female head of state when elected president of Iceland in 1980.


Women’s Power Strengthens Democracy

Despite examples of setbacks reported in the Reykjavík Index and other research studies, the forum was filled with energy and commitment to advancing gender equality, through the Reykjavík Action Items and many conversations about strategies to build women’s power. This collective dedication underscores the reality that we all understand the urgency of addressing gender inequality, and shows how powerful a global community can be when united by a common cause. To take action and keep pushing the needle on gender balance in the United States, it’s important to examine what is working in countries like Iceland to address attitudinal and structural barriers in both the private and public sectors, and consider how those strategies can be adapted and replicated in countries like the United States. The momentum sparked at this event is a testament to the value of doing this work in community, and building a movement dedicated to empowering women leaders. Through collective efforts, we can turn the Reykjavík Action Items into a global reality and work towards representative, equitable, empowered and resilient democracies around the globe.


Sweet treats, candle light to brighten the short days, and soft guitar melodies were all clear signals that the Reykjavik Global Forum is dedicated to building the spaces for women to come together to bridge divides, build relationships, and blaze a path to women’s equality.


https://msmagazine.com/2023/12/22/women-politics-leadership-reykjavik-global-forum-gender-equality-equity/

December 23, 2023

Empowering Change and Building Women's Power: On the Ground at the Reykjavk Global Forum

(An absolutely fascinating, lengthy, important read)


Empowering Change and Building Women’s Power: On the Ground at the Reykjavík Global Forum
12/22/2023 by Cynthia Richie Terrell
The Reykjavík Global Forum convenes women leaders to share solutions on how to further advance society towards gender equity and grow the number of women in leadership positions.


The sixth annual Reykjavík Global Forum, hosted by the government and Parliament of Iceland last month, convened more than 500 people from 80 countries, creating a diverse and dynamic platform to address critical global issues and build women’s power.

I had the honor of representing RepresentWomen (https://www.representwomen.org/) and our mission at the forum and was thrilled to be part of the delegation led by Susannah Wellford, of Running Start alums, who gave a terrific presentation and enriched and diversified the program in many ways.


Running Starts alums presenting at the Reykjavik Global Forum: Caroline Hoover, Sherra Bennet, Alexis Williams and Lyssa Schei Davids.

The forum began with an informative tour of Parliament, where women hold 48 percent of seats, followed by a reception at the home of the president of Iceland, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson and his accomplished wife, author Eliza Reid. Highlights of the gathering included Icelandic pancakes, opening remarks from co-founders of the forum Hanna Birna Kristjansdottir and Silvana Koch-Mehrin, and a welcome from co-chairs Ashley Judd and Adela Raz.


From left: Eliza Reid, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson, Ashley Judd and friends.
‘Power, Together for Leadership’

. . . .



This year the forum incorporated data from the Nordic countries for the first time—Iceland’s score of 92 makes it an interesting case study of what institutional and cultural factors have led to such low levels of attitudinal barriers for women in Iceland, and if they can be replicated and adapted for use elsewhere. It was sobering to learn that overall, most G7 countries have seen stagnant or declining scores in the perception of women’s leadership since 2018.


Focus on Four Action Items

While the index offered a compelling argument for why work is still needed to advance women’s leadership, a session led by Christy Tanner, senior advisor to the Reykjavik Global Forum, provided a terrific roadmap for how to advance women’s leadership. Tanner reported on her work with the Reykjavik Global Action Advisory Board, which led to the development of a new strategy that is focused on the Reykjavík Action Items that serve as powerful tools to transform data into action. These policy initiatives include:

equal pay
equal representation
equal parental leave
ending gender-based violence

All are critically important for building women’s political power and leadership.



“We encourage international women leaders to focus on four key actions to promote equality in the world: equal pay, a more equal share of the sexes in decision-making, equal parental leave and actions to end gender-based violence,” said Hanna Birna Kristjánsdóttir.

. . . . .



. . . .



Michelle Milford Morse with an attendee in Reykjavik.

. . . . . .


Former women presidents with Laura Liswood and Rick Zednik.
. . . .


RepresentWomen advisor Laura Liswood with Running Start CEO and RepresentWomen board member Susannah Wellford.
. . . .

Here is a translation I found online:

“In sight there is now freedom

And it could have been sooner

Now women mass together

and carry signs of freedom

the hour is upon us

let’s all stand hand in hand

and firmly stand our ground

even though many want to go backwards

and others stand in place

we’ll never accept that.”



Forum co-host Ashley Judd with Vigdís Finnbogadóttir, who became the first democratically elected female head of state when elected president of Iceland in 1980.


Women’s Power Strengthens Democracy

Despite examples of setbacks reported in the Reykjavík Index and other research studies, the forum was filled with energy and commitment to advancing gender equality, through the Reykjavík Action Items and many conversations about strategies to build women’s power. This collective dedication underscores the reality that we all understand the urgency of addressing gender inequality, and shows how powerful a global community can be when united by a common cause. To take action and keep pushing the needle on gender balance in the United States, it’s important to examine what is working in countries like Iceland to address attitudinal and structural barriers in both the private and public sectors, and consider how those strategies can be adapted and replicated in countries like the United States. The momentum sparked at this event is a testament to the value of doing this work in community, and building a movement dedicated to empowering women leaders. Through collective efforts, we can turn the Reykjavík Action Items into a global reality and work towards representative, equitable, empowered and resilient democracies around the globe.


Sweet treats, candle light to brighten the short days, and soft guitar melodies were all clear signals that the Reykjavik Global Forum is dedicated to building the spaces for women to come together to bridge divides, build relationships, and blaze a path to women’s equality.


https://msmagazine.com/2023/12/22/women-politics-leadership-reykjavik-global-forum-gender-equality-equity/

December 23, 2023

Empowering Change and Building Women's Power: On the Ground at the Reykjavk Global Forum

(An absolutely fascinating, lengthy, important read)


Empowering Change and Building Women’s Power: On the Ground at the Reykjavík Global Forum
12/22/2023 by Cynthia Richie Terrell
The Reykjavík Global Forum convenes women leaders to share solutions on how to further advance society towards gender equity and grow the number of women in leadership positions.


The sixth annual Reykjavík Global Forum, hosted by the government and Parliament of Iceland last month, convened more than 500 people from 80 countries, creating a diverse and dynamic platform to address critical global issues and build women’s power.

I had the honor of representing RepresentWomen (https://www.representwomen.org/) and our mission at the forum and was thrilled to be part of the delegation led by Susannah Wellford, of Running Start alums, who gave a terrific presentation and enriched and diversified the program in many ways.


Running Starts alums presenting at the Reykjavik Global Forum: Caroline Hoover, Sherra Bennet, Alexis Williams and Lyssa Schei Davids.

The forum began with an informative tour of Parliament, where women hold 48 percent of seats, followed by a reception at the home of the president of Iceland, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson and his accomplished wife, author Eliza Reid. Highlights of the gathering included Icelandic pancakes, opening remarks from co-founders of the forum Hanna Birna Kristjansdottir and Silvana Koch-Mehrin, and a welcome from co-chairs Ashley Judd and Adela Raz.


From left: Eliza Reid, Guðni Th. Jóhannesson, Ashley Judd and friends.
‘Power, Together for Leadership’

. . . .



This year the forum incorporated data from the Nordic countries for the first time—Iceland’s score of 92 makes it an interesting case study of what institutional and cultural factors have led to such low levels of attitudinal barriers for women in Iceland, and if they can be replicated and adapted for use elsewhere. It was sobering to learn that overall, most G7 countries have seen stagnant or declining scores in the perception of women’s leadership since 2018.


Focus on Four Action Items

While the index offered a compelling argument for why work is still needed to advance women’s leadership, a session led by Christy Tanner, senior advisor to the Reykjavik Global Forum, provided a terrific roadmap for how to advance women’s leadership. Tanner reported on her work with the Reykjavik Global Action Advisory Board, which led to the development of a new strategy that is focused on the Reykjavík Action Items that serve as powerful tools to transform data into action. These policy initiatives include:

equal pay
equal representation
equal parental leave
ending gender-based violence

All are critically important for building women’s political power and leadership.



“We encourage international women leaders to focus on four key actions to promote equality in the world: equal pay, a more equal share of the sexes in decision-making, equal parental leave and actions to end gender-based violence,” said Hanna Birna Kristjánsdóttir.

. . . . .



. . . .



Michelle Milford Morse with an attendee in Reykjavik.

. . . . . .


Former women presidents with Laura Liswood and Rick Zednik.
. . . .


RepresentWomen advisor Laura Liswood with Running Start CEO and RepresentWomen board member Susannah Wellford.
. . . .

Here is a translation I found online:

“In sight there is now freedom

And it could have been sooner

Now women mass together

and carry signs of freedom

the hour is upon us

let’s all stand hand in hand

and firmly stand our ground

even though many want to go backwards

and others stand in place

we’ll never accept that.”



Forum co-host Ashley Judd with Vigdís Finnbogadóttir, who became the first democratically elected female head of state when elected president of Iceland in 1980.


Women’s Power Strengthens Democracy

Despite examples of setbacks reported in the Reykjavík Index and other research studies, the forum was filled with energy and commitment to advancing gender equality, through the Reykjavík Action Items and many conversations about strategies to build women’s power. This collective dedication underscores the reality that we all understand the urgency of addressing gender inequality, and shows how powerful a global community can be when united by a common cause. To take action and keep pushing the needle on gender balance in the United States, it’s important to examine what is working in countries like Iceland to address attitudinal and structural barriers in both the private and public sectors, and consider how those strategies can be adapted and replicated in countries like the United States. The momentum sparked at this event is a testament to the value of doing this work in community, and building a movement dedicated to empowering women leaders. Through collective efforts, we can turn the Reykjavík Action Items into a global reality and work towards representative, equitable, empowered and resilient democracies around the globe.


Sweet treats, candle light to brighten the short days, and soft guitar melodies were all clear signals that the Reykjavik Global Forum is dedicated to building the spaces for women to come together to bridge divides, build relationships, and blaze a path to women’s equality.


https://msmagazine.com/2023/12/22/women-politics-leadership-reykjavik-global-forum-gender-equality-equity/

December 23, 2023

Welcome To Wonkette Happy Hour, With This Week's Cocktail, The Espresso Martini!

Welcome To Wonkette Happy Hour, With This Week's Cocktail, The Espresso Martini!
Now she's gone, and I'm out with a friend. Lips full of passion, coffee in bed.
Matthew Hooper
Dec 22, 2023

https://substackcdn.com/image/fetch/w_1456,c_limit,f_webp,q_auto:good,fl_progressive:steep/https%3A%2F%2Fsubstack-post-media.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fpublic%2Fimages%2Fcf33d43c-be25-4c49-9162-e83369b96369_4032x3024.jpeg
This is a pretty nice sipper, by the way. The ABV hovers around 40 or so.

Greetings, Wonketeers! I’m Hooper, your bartender. Let’s get in one more good dessert martini before the holiday ends, one of the the ‘80s classics that goes in and out of style but never wholly fades away. One more pick-me-up to get those last presents wrapped can’t hurt. Time for a rock-solid Espresso Martini. Here’s the recipe:

Espresso Martini

1 ½ oz fresh espresso

1 ½ oz Plantation Three Stars Rum

½ oz Grind Double Espresso Liqueur

Add all ingredients in order to your cocktail shaker. Add ice and shake until chilled and strain into a cold martini glass. Garnish with three coffee beans.

According to legend, the original espresso martini was created in 1983 by London-based bartender Dick Bradsell at Fred’s Club. A young, well-known fashion model came into the bar and specifically asked for a drink that would “wake me up and f**k me up.” Dick’s version was a bit more elaborate than the current modern one; he used both Kahlua and Tia Maria as his coffee liqueurs, and poured a ristretto shot for the cocktail. (Ristretto is a fancy way of drawing an espresso shot that makes it less bitter and more sweet. I can guarantee that the nice teenager behind your local coffee kiosk has no idea how to make one.)

The most intriguing part of the story is that Mr. Bradsell refused to name the supermodel who asked for the drink. He would make broad allusions, but maintained his professional discretion and never named the young woman. The best guesses to date have been Kate Moss or Naomi Campbell. If it was Kate Moss, things would be a bit awkward. She was only 16 back in 1983. Bradsell died in 2016, so he took the secret to the grave with him — along with his unbesmirched liquor license.

There’s a long history of cocktails that use stimulants and alcohol to make you an alert drunk. Irish Coffee is easily my favorite, but White Russians play into the same template. The most lowbrow version of this idea is the dreadful vodka and Red Bull. It looks terrible and tastes worse, but it does get the job done. I recently saw a meme on a bartenders forum that suggested combining Panera’s infamous charged lemonade with Malort to “break a hole into the fourth dimension.” I shuddered and averted my eyes, as if someone had shown me a page from the Necronomicon.

That being said, Dick Bradsell’s original recipe was clearly a child of the ‘80s. Vodka was king back then, and the original was 2:1 vodka to coffee. He also added a touch of simple syrup, which probably counteracted some pretty harsh espresso. I swapped the vodka for my favorite white rum and upped the espresso ratio to match my palate.

The challenge with any espresso martini is temperature. Hot espresso will melt the shaker ice and dilute the cocktail. Most recipes I see suggest letting the espresso sit until it’s room temperature before making the drink. That doesn’t make a lot of sense to me; cold espresso is extremely bitter, and I can’t see drawing shots and letting them sit before service. The simpler answer would be to add your ice to the shaker after you’ve added the ingredients. The liqueurs should temper the espresso to the point where it won’t produce unnecessary melt. To hedge my bet, I’m going to suggest chilling the rum before making the cocktail.

Let’s talk ingredients:

https://substackcdn.com/image/fetch/w_1456,c_limit,f_webp,q_auto:good,fl_progressive:steep/https%3A%2F%2Fsubstack-post-media.s3.amazonaws.com%2Fpublic%2Fimages%2F35020e9e-8c00-44c6-8be4-73761a603590_4032x3024.jpeg
Ingredient shot. Yes, I like Starbucks blonde espresso. Don’t judge.
. . .

https://www.wonkette.com/p/welcome-to-wonkette-happy-hour-with-aa0

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